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Al-Qaida leader claims responsibility for deadly Paris terror attacks

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Nasr Ansi, a top commander of Al Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula

Nasr Ansi, a top commander of Al Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula

Nasr Ansi, a top commander of Al Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula

Yemen's al Qaida branch has claimed responsibility for last week's deadly attack on a Paris satirical newspaper, with one of its top commanders saying the assault was in revenge for the weekly's publications of cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed.

The claim came in a video posting by Nasr Ansi, a top commander of Al Qaida in the Arabian Peninsula, or AQAP as the branch is known, which appeared on the group's Twitter account.

In the 11-minute video, Ansi says the assault on Charlie Hebdo, which killed 12 people - including editors, cartoonists and journalists, as well as two police officers - was in "revenge for the prophet".

He said AQAP "chose the target, laid out the plan and financed the operation" against the weekly, though he produced no evidence to support the claim.

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A woman has taped her mouth  displaying the word Freedom  on the tape,  as she gathers with several thousand people in solidarity with victims of two terrorist attacks in Paris  (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

A woman has taped her mouth displaying the word Freedom on the tape, as she gathers with several thousand people in solidarity with victims of two terrorist attacks in Paris (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

AP

A general view shows hundreds of thousands of French citizens taking part in a solidarity march (Marche Republicaine) in the streets of Paris    REUTERS/Yves Herman

A general view shows hundreds of thousands of French citizens taking part in a solidarity march (Marche Republicaine) in the streets of Paris REUTERS/Yves Herman

REUTERS

Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks

Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks

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A general view shows hundreds of thousands of French citizens taking part in a solidarity march (Marche Republicaine) in the streets of Paris January 11, 2015. French citizens will be joined by dozens of foreign leaders, among them Arab and Muslim representatives, in a march on Sunday in an unprecedented tribute to this week's victims following the shootings by gunmen at the offices of the satirical weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo, the killing of a police woman in Montrouge, and the hostage taking at a kosher supermarket at the Porte de Vincennes.    REUTERS/Eric Gaillard (FRANCE  - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)

A general view shows hundreds of thousands of French citizens taking part in a solidarity march (Marche Republicaine) in the streets of Paris January 11, 2015. French citizens will be joined by dozens of foreign leaders, among them Arab and Muslim representatives, in a march on Sunday in an unprecedented tribute to this week's victims following the shootings by gunmen at the offices of the satirical weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo, the killing of a police woman in Montrouge, and the hostage taking at a kosher supermarket at the Porte de Vincennes. REUTERS/Eric Gaillard (FRANCE - Tags: CRIME LAW POLITICS CIVIL UNREST SOCIETY)

REUTERS

Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks

Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks

Getty Images

PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11:  A statue is modified with a pencil in a show of defiance as demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people are expected to converge in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. French President Francois Hollande will lead the march and will be joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist atrocities started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman.  (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A statue is modified with a pencil in a show of defiance as demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people are expected to converge in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. French President Francois Hollande will lead the march and will be joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist atrocities started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

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PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11:  A pencil is held aloft in a show of defiance as demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people are expected to converge in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. French President Francois Hollande will lead the march and will be joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist atrocities started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman.  (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: A pencil is held aloft in a show of defiance as demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people are expected to converge in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. French President Francois Hollande will lead the march and will be joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist atrocities started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

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PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11:  Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

Getty Images

PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11:  Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people are expected to converge in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. French President Francois Hollande will lead the march and will be joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist atrocities started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman.  (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people are expected to converge in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. French President Francois Hollande will lead the march and will be joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist atrocities started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

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Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France.

Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France.

Getty Images

A giant figure depicting Marianne, the symbol of France, is surrounded by hundreds of thousands of French citizens taking part in a solidarity march (Marche Republicaine) in the streets of Paris       REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes

A giant figure depicting Marianne, the symbol of France, is surrounded by hundreds of thousands of French citizens taking part in a solidarity march (Marche Republicaine) in the streets of Paris REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes

REUTERS

PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11:  Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people are expected to converge in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. French President Francois Hollande will lead the march and will be joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist atrocities started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman.  (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people are expected to converge in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. French President Francois Hollande will lead the march and will be joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist atrocities started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

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The National Gallery in London's Trafalgar Square is illuminated with the colours of the French Tricolore flag, in support of the victims of recent terrorist attacks in France, including on the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo (Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire)

The National Gallery in London's Trafalgar Square is illuminated with the colours of the French Tricolore flag, in support of the victims of recent terrorist attacks in France, including on the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo (Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire)

PA

A journalist holds up a placard as he joins with other Lebanese and foreign journalists, activists and intellectuals during a sit-in to show their solidarity with the victims of Wednesday's attack in Paris on the Charlie Hebdo newspaper, in downtown Beirut, Lebanon, (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)

A journalist holds up a placard as he joins with other Lebanese and foreign journalists, activists and intellectuals during a sit-in to show their solidarity with the victims of Wednesday's attack in Paris on the Charlie Hebdo newspaper, in downtown Beirut, Lebanon, (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)

AP

Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks

Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks

Getty Images

PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11:  French President Francois Hollande (R) speaks with Joel Mergui (C), President of the Central Jewish Consistory of France) and representatives of French Jewish associations after a meeting at the Elysee Palace on January 11, 2015, in Paris, France. More than a million people and dozens of world leaders were expected to march through Paris on January 11 in a historic display of global defiance against extremism after Islamist attacks that killed 17 victims.  (Photo by Thierry Chesnot/Getty Images)

PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: French President Francois Hollande (R) speaks with Joel Mergui (C), President of the Central Jewish Consistory of France) and representatives of French Jewish associations after a meeting at the Elysee Palace on January 11, 2015, in Paris, France. More than a million people and dozens of world leaders were expected to march through Paris on January 11 in a historic display of global defiance against extremism after Islamist attacks that killed 17 victims. (Photo by Thierry Chesnot/Getty Images)

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PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11:  French President Francois Hollande (R) speaks with Joel Mergui (C), President of the Central Jewish Consistory of France) and representatives of French Jewish associations after a meeting at the Elysee Palace on January 11, 2015, in Paris, France. More than a million people and dozens of world leaders were expected to march through Paris on January 11 in a historic display of global defiance against extremism after Islamist attacks that killed 17 victims.  (Photo by Thierry Chesnot/Getty Images)

PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: French President Francois Hollande (R) speaks with Joel Mergui (C), President of the Central Jewish Consistory of France) and representatives of French Jewish associations after a meeting at the Elysee Palace on January 11, 2015, in Paris, France. More than a million people and dozens of world leaders were expected to march through Paris on January 11 in a historic display of global defiance against extremism after Islamist attacks that killed 17 victims. (Photo by Thierry Chesnot/Getty Images)

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PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11:  The President of the CRIF (Representative Council of France's Jewish Associations) Roger Cukierman (2R) and the President of the Central Jewish Consistory of France, Joel Mergui (2L), speak to the media after a meeting between French President and French Jewish associations at the Elysee Palace on January 11, 2015, in Paris, France. More than a million people and dozens of world leaders were expected to march through Paris on January 11 in a historic display of global defiance against extremism after Islamist attacks that killed 17  (Photo by Thierry Chesnot/Getty Images)

PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: The President of the CRIF (Representative Council of France's Jewish Associations) Roger Cukierman (2R) and the President of the Central Jewish Consistory of France, Joel Mergui (2L), speak to the media after a meeting between French President and French Jewish associations at the Elysee Palace on January 11, 2015, in Paris, France. More than a million people and dozens of world leaders were expected to march through Paris on January 11 in a historic display of global defiance against extremism after Islamist attacks that killed 17 (Photo by Thierry Chesnot/Getty Images)

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PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11:  Posters are hung near to Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people are expected to converge in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. French President Francois Hollande will lead the march and will be joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist atrocities started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman.  (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: Posters are hung near to Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people are expected to converge in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. French President Francois Hollande will lead the march and will be joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist atrocities started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

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PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11:  Posters are hung near to Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people are expected to converge in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. French President Francois Hollande will lead the march and will be joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist atrocities started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman.  (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

PARIS, FRANCE - JANUARY 11: Posters are hung near to Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks on January 11, 2015 in Paris, France. An estimated one million people are expected to converge in central Paris for the Unity March joining in solidarity with the 17 victims of this week's terrorist attacks in the country. French President Francois Hollande will lead the march and will be joined by world leaders in a sign of unity. The terrorist atrocities started on Wednesday with the attack on the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12, and ended on Friday with sieges at a printing company in Dammartin en Goele and a Kosher supermarket in Paris with four hostages and three suspects being killed. A fourth suspect, Hayat Boumeddiene, 26, escaped and is wanted in connection with the murder of a policewoman. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

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Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks

Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks

Getty Images

Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks

Demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks

Getty Images

Demonstrators gather near Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks

Demonstrators gather near Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks

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A statue is modified with a pen in a show of defiance as demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks

A statue is modified with a pen in a show of defiance as demonstrators gather in Place de la Republique prior to a mass unity rally to be held in Paris following the recent terrorist attacks

Getty Images

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A woman has taped her mouth displaying the word Freedom on the tape, as she gathers with several thousand people in solidarity with victims of two terrorist attacks in Paris (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

The assault was the beginning of three days of terror in France that saw 17 people killed before the perpetrators, three Islamic extremist attackers, were gunned down by security forces.

Said and Cherif Kouachi, the two brothers who carried out the Charlie Hebdo attack, were "heroes", Ansi said.

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An explosion at Dammartin-en-Goële as French special forces move in on brothers Said (34), and Cherif Kouachi (32)

An explosion at Dammartin-en-Goële as French special forces move in on brothers Said (34), and Cherif Kouachi (32)

The scene outside the Paris grocery store as French special forces prepared to move on the hostage takers

The scene outside the Paris grocery store as French special forces prepared to move on the hostage takers

The scene as French special forces stormed the Paris grocery store where a number of hostages were being held

The scene as French special forces stormed the Paris grocery store where a number of hostages were being held

Hostages flee from the Paris grocery store after French special forces moved to end the siege

Hostages flee from the Paris grocery store after French special forces moved to end the siege

Armed securtiy forces fly overhead in a military helicopter  in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

Armed securtiy forces fly overhead in a military helicopter in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

AP

Création Tendance Découverte, a printing business in Dammartin-en-Goële where the Charlie Hebdo shooting suspects are holed up

Création Tendance Découverte, a printing business in Dammartin-en-Goële where the Charlie Hebdo shooting suspects are holed up

Armed securtiy forces fly overhead in a military helicopter  in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

Armed securtiy forces fly overhead in a military helicopter in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

AP

A helicopter with members of the French intervention gendarme forces hover above the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. Reuters/Christian Hartmann

A helicopter with members of the French intervention gendarme forces hover above the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. Reuters/Christian Hartmann

REUTERS

Armed securtiy forces fly overhead in a military helicopter  in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

Armed securtiy forces fly overhead in a military helicopter in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

AP

Members of the French gendarmerie intervention forces arrive at the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. Reuters/Christian Hartmann

Members of the French gendarmerie intervention forces arrive at the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. Reuters/Christian Hartmann

REUTERS

Police vans are lined up in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast Paris, as part of an operation to seize two heavily armed suspects. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)

Police vans are lined up in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast Paris, as part of an operation to seize two heavily armed suspects. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)

AP

French gendarmes secure the roundabout near the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. Reuters/Eric Gaillard

French gendarmes secure the roundabout near the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. Reuters/Eric Gaillard

REUTERS

A member of the security forces walks inside Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

A member of the security forces walks inside Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

AP

A French Army helicopter with intervention forces hovers near the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. Reuters/Christian Hartmann

A French Army helicopter with intervention forces hovers near the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. Reuters/Christian Hartmann

REUTERS

Gendarmes block the access to Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Gendarmes block the access to Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

AP

Police and army forces take positions in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast Paris, as part of an operation to seize two heavily armed suspects. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)

Police and army forces take positions in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast Paris, as part of an operation to seize two heavily armed suspects. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)

AP

Ambulances arrive in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast Paris, as part of an operation to seize two heavily armed suspects. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)

Ambulances arrive in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast Paris, as part of an operation to seize two heavily armed suspects. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)

AP

French gendarmes secure the roundabout near the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. Reuters/Eric Gaillard

French gendarmes secure the roundabout near the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. Reuters/Eric Gaillard

REUTERS

Helicopters with French intervention forces hover above the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. Reuters/Pascal Rossignol

Helicopters with French intervention forces hover above the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. Reuters/Pascal Rossignol

REUTERS

Police officers control the access to Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

Police officers control the access to Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

AP

Journalists work near the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. Reuters/Eric Gaillard

Journalists work near the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. Reuters/Eric Gaillard

REUTERS

A gendarme van is parked in a gas station in Villers Cotteret, 80 kilometers northeast of Paris, Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015, where the suspects were reportedly spotted, a day after masked gunmen stormed the offices of a satirical newspaper and killed 12 people. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)

A gendarme van is parked in a gas station in Villers Cotteret, 80 kilometers northeast of Paris, Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015, where the suspects were reportedly spotted, a day after masked gunmen stormed the offices of a satirical newspaper and killed 12 people. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)

AP

Police officers investigate a gas station in Villers Cotteret, 80 kilometers northeast of Paris, Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015, where the suspects were reportedly spotted, a day after masked gunmen stormed the offices of a satirical newspaper and killed 12 people. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)

Police officers investigate a gas station in Villers Cotteret, 80 kilometers northeast of Paris, Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015, where the suspects were reportedly spotted, a day after masked gunmen stormed the offices of a satirical newspaper and killed 12 people. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)

AP

A gendarme car is parked in a gas station in Villers Cotteret, 80 kilometers northeast of Paris, where the suspects were reportedly spotted, Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015,  a day after masked gunmen stormed the offices of a satirical newspaper and killed 12 people. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)

A gendarme car is parked in a gas station in Villers Cotteret, 80 kilometers northeast of Paris, where the suspects were reportedly spotted, Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015, a day after masked gunmen stormed the offices of a satirical newspaper and killed 12 people. (AP Photo/Michel Spingler)

AP

A member of the French GIPN intervention police forces secure a neighbourhood in Corcy, northeast of Paris. Photo: Reuters

A member of the French GIPN intervention police forces secure a neighbourhood in Corcy, northeast of Paris. Photo: Reuters

REUTERS

Members of the French gendarmerie intervention forces arrive at the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris January 9, 2015. The two main suspects in the weekly satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo killings were sighted on Friday in the northern French town of Dammartin-en-Goele where at least one person had been taken hostage, a police source said. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

Members of the French gendarmerie intervention forces arrive at the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris January 9, 2015. The two main suspects in the weekly satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo killings were sighted on Friday in the northern French town of Dammartin-en-Goele where at least one person had been taken hostage, a police source said. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

REUTERS

A helicopter with members of the French intervention gendarme forces hover above the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. Reuters/Christian Hartmann

A helicopter with members of the French intervention gendarme forces hover above the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris. Reuters/Christian Hartmann

REUTERS

An helicopter flies over Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris, Friday Jan. 9, 2015.   French security forces swarmed a small industrial town northeast of Paris on Friday in an operation to capture a pair of heavily armed suspects in the deadly storming of a satirical newspaper. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

An helicopter flies over Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris, Friday Jan. 9, 2015. French security forces swarmed a small industrial town northeast of Paris on Friday in an operation to capture a pair of heavily armed suspects in the deadly storming of a satirical newspaper. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

AP

Members of the French intervention gendarme forces arrive at the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris January 9, 2015. The two main suspects in the weekly satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo killings were sighted on Friday in the northern French town of Dammartin-en-Goele where at least one person had been taken hostage, a police source said. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

Members of the French intervention gendarme forces arrive at the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris January 9, 2015. The two main suspects in the weekly satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo killings were sighted on Friday in the northern French town of Dammartin-en-Goele where at least one person had been taken hostage, a police source said. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

REUTERS

Members of the French intervention gendarme forces arrive at the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris January 9, 2015.  REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

Members of the French intervention gendarme forces arrive at the scene of a hostage taking at an industrial zone in Dammartin-en-Goele, northeast of Paris January 9, 2015. REUTERS/Christian Hartmann

REUTERS

Said (left) and Cherif Kouachi, the Parisian brothers of Algerian descent who are suspected of carrying out the attack on the offices of French satirical magazine ‘Charlie Hebdo’, in which 12 people were murdered. Photos: PAtwo

Said (left) and Cherif Kouachi, the Parisian brothers of Algerian descent who are suspected of carrying out the attack on the offices of French satirical magazine ‘Charlie Hebdo’, in which 12 people were murdered. Photos: PAtwo

French Interior minister Bernard Cazeneuve (centre) surrounded by National Police Director Jean-Marc Falcone (right) and National Gendarmerie Director Denis Favier delivers a speech as he leaves after a meeting the Elysee Palace in Paris. Reuters/Philippe Wojazer

French Interior minister Bernard Cazeneuve (centre) surrounded by National Police Director Jean-Marc Falcone (right) and National Gendarmerie Director Denis Favier delivers a speech as he leaves after a meeting the Elysee Palace in Paris. Reuters/Philippe Wojazer

REUTERS

As a tribute for the victims of yesterday's terrorist attack the lights of the Eiffel Tower were turned off for five minutes at 8pm local time

As a tribute for the victims of yesterday's terrorist attack the lights of the Eiffel Tower were turned off for five minutes at 8pm local time

Getty Images

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An explosion at Dammartin-en-Goële as French special forces move in on brothers Said (34), and Cherif Kouachi (32)

"Congratulations to you, the Nation of Islam, for this revenge that has soothed our pain," said Ansi. "Congratulations to you for these brave men who blew off the dust of disgrace and lit the torch of glory in the darkness of defeat and agony."

Ansi accused France of belonging to the "party of Satan" and said the European country "shared all of America's crimes" against Muslims - a reference to France's military offensive in Mali.

He also warned of more "tragedies and terror" in the future.

Washington considers AQAP to be one of al Qaida's most dangerous offshoots. Formed in 2009 as a merger between the terror group's Yemeni and Saudi branches, AQAP has been blamed for a string of unsuccessful bomb plots against American targets.

These include a foiled plan to down a Detroit-bound airliner in 2009 using a new type of explosive hidden in the bomber's underwear, and another attempt a year later to send mail bombs hidden in toner cartridges on planes bound to the US from the Gulf.

The Charlie Hebdo strike is the Yemen-based branch's first successful strike outside its home territory - and a triumph for its trademark double-strategy of waging jihad in Yemen to build its strength to strike abroad.

At least one of the two brothers involved in the attack on the weekly travelled to Yemen in 2011 and either received training from or fought alongside the group, authorities say.

A US intelligence assessment described to the Associated Press shows that 34-year-old Said Kouachi was trained in preparation to return home and carry out an attack.

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French President Francois Hollande leans over the coffin of late Police officer Franck Brinsolaro during a ceremony to pay tribute to the three police officers killed in the attacks, in Paris, France. Police officers Ahmed Merabet, 40, Franck Brinsolaro, 49, were killed during the attacks at Charlie Hebdo, and Clarissa Jean-Philippe killed in Montrouge last week (AP Photo/Francois Mori) Video