Monday 23 April 2018

Logan Paul says he is a ‘good guy’ in first TV interview since controversial suicide video

The YouTube star said criticism he has received was ‘fair’.

Logan Paul (Richard Shotwell/AP)
Logan Paul (Richard Shotwell/AP)

By Edd Dracott, Press Association

Logan Paul has said he is a “good guy who made a bad decision” in his first TV interview since his controversial video showing what appeared to be a Japanese suicide victim.

Speaking to ABC’s Good Morning America, the 22-year-old YouTube star said the video, posted a month ago to his 16 million subscribers, showed a “horrible lack of judgement”.

Paul told ABC’s Michael Strahan the criticism he has received has been “fair” and suggested he had intended the video to be educational.

“The idea was to shock and show the harsh realities of suicide and get people talking about something that I don’t think people are talking about much,” he said.

“Still that’s the goal today.”

Paul’s video from Aokigahara forest near Mount Fuji in Japan, a site known for suicides, appeared to show a body hanging from a tree and caused outrage online.

Paul said he had not expected to find the body despite the site’s reputation and thought he came across it for a reason: “So I could take this experience, learn from it, spread the message the right way, about suicide prevention and suicide prevention awareness.”

He said he will “think twice … maybe three times” about what he posts.

Hours after the ABC interview was posted online, Paul commented on an Instagram post by music star Cardi B in what appears to be a reference to the backlash he has received since he posted the footage from Japan.

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Logan Paul's comment on Instagram

“They trinna crucify me like they did Christ,” read the rapper’s post, to which Paul replied “lawlz u tellin me.”

After Paul posted the controversial video, YouTube said it violated their policies and suspended his account, but he returned to the platform with a video on suicide prevention last week.

Press Association

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