Monday 19 February 2018

Legal bid to protect Jersey's cream

At present, any cream produced by Jersey cows anywhere in the world can be marketed as Jersey cream
At present, any cream produced by Jersey cows anywhere in the world can be marketed as Jersey cream

A group of farmers on the Channel Island of Jersey are to launch a legal bid to protect the brand name of their cream.

At present, any cream produced by Jersey cows anywhere in the world can be marketed as Jersey cream.

But now the Jersey Dairy co-operative of 27 farmers is to apply for Protected Designation of Origin status with the European Commission. This would mean that only cream produced on Jersey could be sold as Jersey cream.

Farmers on the island have already applied for similar protection for Jersey butter.

Christopher Journeaux, Jersey Dairy marketing director, said: "Local people are rightly proud of the Jersey cow and the products made from her milk and cream and we are keen to ensure that consumers can be confident that if butter claims to be Jersey butter that it actually comes from here.

"Jersey cows are renowned for the quality of their milk but the ones over here enjoy a longer grazing period, from February to early November, than their cousins on British mainland soil. We believe that it is this long period on grass combined with the unique environment of Jersey with its long hours of sunshine and sea air makes our dairy products so sought after.

"We are already seeking Protected Designation of Origin status for our butter and now intend to make a further application for our cream."

Nick Hall, cream buyer for Tesco, said the store supported the farmer's bid. He said: "If you're a real foodie and a cream fan then there is absolutely nothing quite as good as real Jersey cream, produced on the island. But unfortunately until now the Jersey cream most of us buy over on the British mainland is quite different to the real thing produced on the island itself.

"What gives authentic Jersey Cream its unique flavour is down to the herd actually having grazed on the island's rich grass resulting in a rich milk containing higher than normal levels of protein and calcium. It is this that produces real Jersey cream's characteristic golden colour, richer flavour and creamy texture."

Mr Hall explained that Jersey milk had long been recognised for its rich texture and slightly yellow colour. He added: "The Jersey cow does not process carotene from its food and so the colour is transferred to the butter and even gives cream a very notable hue."

Press Association

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