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Protests against 'presumed' student massacre turn violent

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A demonstrator burns a photograph of Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto during a protest in support of the 43 missing Ayotzinapa students. Thousands took to the streets across Mexico protesting over President Enrique Pena Nieto's handling of the apparent massacre of the trainee school teachers after their abduction (REUTERS/Daniel Becerril)

A demonstrator burns a photograph of Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto during a protest in support of the 43 missing Ayotzinapa students. Thousands took to the streets across Mexico protesting over President Enrique Pena Nieto's handling of the apparent massacre of the trainee school teachers after their abduction (REUTERS/Daniel Becerril)

REUTERS

Federal police spray protestors with fire extinguishers as they drive them back from the National Palace in Mexico City. Protesters marched in the capital city to demand authorities find 43 missing college students, seeking to pressure the government. Mexico officially lists more than 20 thousand people as having gone missing since the start of the country's drug war in 2006, and the search for the missing students has turned up other, unrelated mass graves (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

Federal police spray protestors with fire extinguishers as they drive them back from the National Palace in Mexico City. Protesters marched in the capital city to demand authorities find 43 missing college students, seeking to pressure the government. Mexico officially lists more than 20 thousand people as having gone missing since the start of the country's drug war in 2006, and the search for the missing students has turned up other, unrelated mass graves (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

AP

A man faces off federal police as protestors attempted to break down a barrier in front of the National Palace in Mexico City. Protesters marched in the capital city to demand authorities find 43 missing college students, seeking to pressure the government. Mexico officially lists more than 20 thousand people as having gone missing since the start of the country's drug war in 2006, and the search for the missing students has turned up other, unrelated mass graves (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

A man faces off federal police as protestors attempted to break down a barrier in front of the National Palace in Mexico City. Protesters marched in the capital city to demand authorities find 43 missing college students, seeking to pressure the government. Mexico officially lists more than 20 thousand people as having gone missing since the start of the country's drug war in 2006, and the search for the missing students has turned up other, unrelated mass graves (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

AP

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A demonstrator burns a photograph of Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto during a protest in support of the 43 missing Ayotzinapa students. Thousands took to the streets across Mexico protesting over President Enrique Pena Nieto's handling of the apparent massacre of the trainee school teachers after their abduction (REUTERS/Daniel Becerril)

Protesters angry at the presumed massacre of 43 students clashed with police outside Mexico’s National Palace after a massive march demanding President Enrique Pena Nieto’s resignation.

The face-off marred a mostly peaceful rally of tens of thousands of black-clad people in the capital, where they waved blackened Mexican flags and chanted “Urgent! Urgent for the president to resign!”

Parents of the 43 male college students, who reject claims their sons are dead and demand the government find them alive, led the latest nationwide demonstration to the historic National Palace.

Shouting “Pena Nieto Out,” some protesters threw powerful firecrackers at the fenced-off palace, which the Mexican president only uses for ceremonies.

Hundreds of riot police sprayed water and fired tear gas at protesters. Some charged the officers, kicking at their shields. Other protesters shouted “No violence!” The crime has infuriated Mexicans fed up with corruption, impunity and a drug war that has left more than 100,000 people dead or missing since 2006.

The case has turned into the biggest challenge of Pena Nieto’s nearly two-year-old presidency, on top of another scandal over a mansion his wife bought from a government contractor.

Prosecutors say a drug gang confessed to slaying the students and burning their bodies after receiving them from corrupt police in the southern state of Guerrero in September. “Mexico is used to tragedy, robberies and corruption, and we need to begin to exercise our rights as citizens to get the government working,” said Lili Correa (46) wearing black.

The demonstration coincided with the anniversary of the start of the 1910 Mexican revolution, prompting the government to cancel the annual parade. Before the march, masked protesters threw firebombs and used bazooka-like tubes to launch firecrackers at riot police, who hit back with tear gas to disperse the group on a street near the airport. Around 15 people were detained.

Thousands protested in several other cities, including Chilpancingo, the capital of Guerrero, the violence-plagued southern state where the students vanished nearly two months ago. Thousands more marched in Bolivia and some 200 took to the streets in El Salvador.

Mexico and Real Madrid football star Javier “Chicharito” Hernandez tweeted a picture of himself wearing a black hoodie and the hashtag #WeAreAllAyotzinapa, referring to the young men’s Ayotzinapa college

Online Editors