Wednesday 13 December 2017

Plane lost in 1961 finally found in Andes 54 years later

An expedition team pose for a photo on the wreckage of a plane that crashed in the Andes 54 years ago, killing 24 people, including eight players and the coach of the top-flight Green Cross soccer club. The disappearance of the Douglas DC-3 on April 3, 1961 was one of the great unsolved mysteries in the South American country and at the time stunned the sporting world
An expedition team pose for a photo on the wreckage of a plane that crashed in the Andes 54 years ago, killing 24 people, including eight players and the coach of the top-flight Green Cross soccer club. The disappearance of the Douglas DC-3 on April 3, 1961 was one of the great unsolved mysteries in the South American country and at the time stunned the sporting world
Independent.ie Newsdesk

Independent.ie Newsdesk

After a gruelling journey up into the rarefied air of the Andes mountains, an expedition team announced it has discovered the fuselage of a passenger plane that went missing over a half century ago.

The LAN Chile Douglas DC-3 twin-propeller aircraft was reported missing on April 3, 1961, near the city of Linares, some 186 miles south of the Chilean capital of Santiago. Eight players and the coach of the top-flight Green Cross soccer club, as well as three referees, were among the 24 passengers travelling aboard the plane.

Perils of London

Londoners in the 17th century were never far from danger, as plague, infant mortality and angry mobs menaced the capital, burial records dug up by the Crossrail construction project showed yesterday.

Crossrail, an €18bn railway link connecting east and west London due to open in 2018, is conducting a marathon digging operation.

Mum's the word

A BRAZILIAN soccer club has employed fans' mothers to act as stewards in the hope it will discourage supporters from fighting. Sport Club do Recife trained around 30 mothers for a derby against Nautico and put them to work patrolling the pitch perimeter dressed in high-visibility vests bearing the words "Seguranca Mae," or "Security Moms" in Portuguese.

'Professor Dumpster'

It may sound like a rubbish place to live in for a year, but for one academic, a skip was home in an effort to promote sustainability. Jeff Wilson, of Huston-Tillotson University in Texas, lived in the dustbin for one year to show his students that human beings can live with less.

He shared his experiences via Instagram. Professor Wilson - dubbed Professor Dumpster - even added solar panels and air conditioning to the skip in Austin, Texas.

'Snowwhere' to hide

Police in the Netherlands have swooped on a house in the town of Haarlem, arresting the owner for growing cannabis plants, after they noticed that his house was the only one in the street not covered in snow.

A dusting of snow covered all the roofs in the town, except for one.

Once inside, police found industrial-scale cultivation of cannabis, and the heat lamps used to nurture the plants.

Irish Independent

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