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Ferguson victim's mum says officer was 'out to kill'

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Children walk past a mural of Michael Brown in the Bushwick neighborhood of Brooklyn in New York. Brown was shot to death by police officer Darren Wilson on August 9th in Ferguson, Missouri

Children walk past a mural of Michael Brown in the Bushwick neighborhood of Brooklyn in New York. Brown was shot to death by police officer Darren Wilson on August 9th in Ferguson, Missouri

REUTERS

A protester holds a placard during a demonstration in Times Square, New York, following Monday's grand jury decision in the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri

A protester holds a placard during a demonstration in Times Square, New York, following Monday's grand jury decision in the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri

REUTERS

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Children walk past a mural of Michael Brown in the Bushwick neighborhood of Brooklyn in New York. Brown was shot to death by police officer Darren Wilson on August 9th in Ferguson, Missouri

The parents of Michael Brown have lashed out at the white police officer who gunned down their son, saying the policeman "wanted to kill someone" on the day he shot the unarmed black teenager.

Speaking after a grand jury cleared him of the August killing, Officer Darren Wilson said he had "a clear conscience" and would have opened fire again if the confrontation on a Ferguson street was replayed.

His words were met with fury by protesters in this Missouri city and condemned by Michael Brown Senior and Lesley McSpadden, the parents of the dead 18-year-old.

"I don't believe a word of it," Ms McSpadden said, when asked about the claim her son had thrown the first punch and been killed while charging down the street towards Mr Wilson.

"[Mr Wilson] didn't do what he had to do, he did what he wanted do ... he wanted to kill someone."

Ms McSpadden wept as she said that her son's body was left lying in the street in the summer heat for so long that his organs could not be donated.

As Mr Brown's parents push for national legislation forcing police to wear cameras on their uniforms, Mr Wilson said he was hoping to one day leave hiding and resume a normal life.

The officer, who recently married and whose wife is pregnant, said Mr Brown had tried to wrestle his gun out of his hands during a struggle and that he believed the six-foot, four-inch teenager was capable of beating him to death.

"The reason I have a clean conscience is that I know I did my job right," he said.

Witnesses who testified before the grand jury offered different accounts of the August 9 shooting, with some saying Mr Brown had his hands up in surrender when he died and others claiming he charged at Mr Wilson.

The US Justice Department is still investigating the case and federal prosecutors could in theory bring civil rights charges against Mr Wilson, but that is widely considered unlikely.

Thousands of heavily armed National Guard troops and riot police surged onto the streets of Ferguson on Tuesday, successfully preventing a second night of widespread violence.

While there were intermittent clashes near the Ferguson police headquarters - and officers once again filled the cold night air with tear gas - there was no repeat of the arson and looting seen on Monday, but troops were on standby. (© Daily Telegraph, London)

Irish Independent