| 17.1°C Dublin

Close

Premium

The Wine Buff: The Australian Chardonnay that will change perceptions

Australian varieties of the grape have had a bad rap in the past but Margaret River wines will change perceptions

Close

World Chardonnay Day is next Thursday

World Chardonnay Day is next Thursday

Vasse Felix Filius Chardonnay 2018

Vasse Felix Filius Chardonnay 2018

Shaw + Smith, `M3` Adelaide Hills Chardonnay 2018

Shaw + Smith, `M3` Adelaide Hills Chardonnay 2018

Tuffeau 2017 Blancs de Blancs Brut Nature

Tuffeau 2017 Blancs de Blancs Brut Nature

Delheim Sur Lie Chardonnay 2017

Delheim Sur Lie Chardonnay 2017

Lidl Australian Chardonnay 2019

Lidl Australian Chardonnay 2019

/

So yes, I'm talking about Chardonnay again. I know I focused on it fairly recently after sommelier Julie Dupouy hosted a very interesting tasting of Chardonnays from around the world. This time, I'm taking a closer look at Australian Chardonnay. Because World Chardonnay Day is next Thursday, and no matter what anyone says, it always seems to be the bottles from Oz that get the rap for being the big, oaky offenders. Which is simply not the case any more.

I was so, so lucky to have had the opportunity to visit Australia last October, a memory that feels more poignant than ever. Among the regions I travelled to was Margaret River, a small cape on the west coast, which is about three hours south of Perth, one of the most isolated major cities in the world. It is as close to Jakarta as it is to Adelaide, its nearest Australian neighbour.

Virginia Willcock, the winemaker at Vasse Felix, explained that the Margaret River region is ranked as one of the top 35 biodiversity hotspots in the world. Relaxed, with dramatic surf waves kissing the sands of practically deserted beaches, the unique climate and soil in the region has proved to be spectacularly well suited to growing premium-quality vines.