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'I knew Séamus and I would be good dads, but we didn't know what Ireland would think of us' - four men open up about the pressures of modern-day fatherhood

Seismic shifts in Irish society in recent decades have redefined modern parenting - but what does it mean to be a father in 2020? Four Irish men tell Alex Meehan about the highs and lows of being a 21st-century dad.

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Modern fatherhood: Gearoid Kenny Moore with his children, twins Seán and Mary

Modern fatherhood: Gearoid Kenny Moore with his children, twins Seán and Mary

Hair-rising experience: Ben Marquez Keenan and his son Ari

Hair-rising experience: Ben Marquez Keenan and his son Ari

Ben Marquez Keenan and his son Ari

Ben Marquez Keenan and his son Ari

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Modern fatherhood: Gearoid Kenny Moore with his children, twins Seán and Mary

Fifty years ago, being a successful dad meant feeding and clothing your children, keeping a roof over their heads, and helping them learn a trade or get an education.

Fifty years before that, most Irish fathers would have regarded themselves as successful if they'd just managed the feeding, clothing and housing - for many, education was an unattainable luxury.

Today, not only does Irish society expect parents to feed, clothe and mind their children, but also to educate them to third or even postgraduate level, and to produce emotionally resilient adults able to negotiate a social-media-driven world.