News Weather

Saturday 25 November 2017

'We're still picking up the pieces after storm damage'

Ray Madden, Catherine O’Carroll and Thomas O’Carroll cleaning up at O’Carroll’s Cove Seafront Bar at Castlecove, Co Kerry, after the storms of last year. Photo: Don MacMonagle
Ray Madden, Catherine O’Carroll and Thomas O’Carroll cleaning up at O’Carroll’s Cove Seafront Bar at Castlecove, Co Kerry, after the storms of last year. Photo: Don MacMonagle
Majella O'Sullivan

Majella O'Sullivan

Ray Madden and his partner Catherine O'Carroll stayed up all night watching on helplessly as the ocean angrily laid siege to their home and business.

The swell was so high they couldn't even see the Beara Peninsula on the other side of Kenmare Bay, directly opposite their bar and restaurant in Caherdaniel, Co Kerry. Waves as high as 20 metres battered the Ring of Kerry road, leaving a trail of destruction in their wake.

O'Carroll's Cove Seafront Bar and Restaurant has been in the O'Carroll family for 31 years. But it was devastated in last winter's storms - as they caused more than €70,000 in damage to their property, blocking off their access road and tearing up tarmac, decking, planting and walls.

Kerry was one of the counties worst affected by last year's storms, suffering extensive erosion to its coastline as well as structural damage to roads, sea walls and properties.

A number of homes and businesses were also flooded in the Cromane/Rossbeigh area and in Ballylongford.

However, because their property is located at the end of a private road, Ray and Catherine didn't even qualify for the emergency funding for storm damage.

They're still counting the cost and feel they'll need another two good summers before they can finally say they've put winter 2014 behind them.

"It took months to put right and if the truth were known, we're still picking up the pieces. We did have insurance but it didn't cover everything. We probably got less than half of what the storm damage cost us," Mr Madden told the Irish Independent.

"We have an eight-week business basically. It's very seasonal so you're on the back pedal all the time.

"We also had put a lot of investment into the property over the last number of years.We thought we were coming out the other end but then the storm came and ripped the place apart externally."

Irish Independent

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