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Irish photographer captures stunning ‘super strawberry moon’ at Hook Lighthouse as people urged to watch the skies again tonight

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Olly Griffin's picture of the Hook Lighthouse with the super strawberry moon rising beside it on the night of Tuesday June 14. Picture: Olly Griffin

Olly Griffin's picture of the Hook Lighthouse with the super strawberry moon rising beside it on the night of Tuesday June 14. Picture: Olly Griffin

Olly Griffin's picture of the Hook Lighthouse with the super strawberry moon rising beside it on the night of Tuesday June 14. Picture: Olly Griffin

A photographer has said he waited three years before capturing a stunning image of a ‘super strawberry moon’ rising alongside the Hook Lighthouse in Co Wexford this week.

Olly Griffin said he keeps a close eye on sun and moon rising times, as well as the weather.

“I knew that the strawberry full moon would be rising in the east, and that I would have a great view of it relative to Hook Head Lighthouse in Wexford, from Dunmore East in Waterford,” he said.

“I used an app called photopills then to pinpoint my location in Dunmore East so that the moon and lighthouse would be aligned and framed just as I wanted. As it happens it was at the third tee on Dunmore East Golf Club.

“And after two unsuccessful attempts over three years [due to cloud cover] the five-hour round trip finally paid off last night and it was third time luck and this is the result.”

The ‘super strawberry moon’ stunned skywatchers across the country last night and was expected to make another spectacular appearance in the early hours of Thursday.

David Moore of Astronomy Ireland said the supermoon is a “three-day event as far as the human eye is concerned”. It started on Monday and is due to end on Wednesday night, with skywatchers across the globe keeping their eyes on the skies for the phenomenon.

Mr Moore urged astronomy lovers to venture outside on Wednesday night in order to catch a glimpse, and he said moonrise is set to take place at 11.54pm.

A supermoon takes place when the full moon coincides with the moon coming within 90pc of its closest approach to Earth, or perigee.

Mr Moore said the moon’s orbit is usually egg-shaped and is not perfectly round.

The supermoon was visible across the Americas, Europe and Asia early this morning.

Mr Moore said the next supermoon of the year will be visible on July 13 and the final one of the 2022 should be visible on August 12. The next supermoon will not take place until July 2023.

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“A supermoon always looks spectacular, at this time of year the full moon is low in the sky and rises gradually,” Mr Moore said.

“As the moon rises it hangs just over the horizon and is the most impressive view.”

Mr Moore said a supermoon appears around 15pc larger and 30pc brighter than a full moon when the moon is at its furthest point from Earth.

He said this is known as the moon illusion as it appears to be much bigger than it actually is.

Mr Moore added that viewing the supermoon can be weather dependent.

“There are usually three or four supermoons per season, cloud cover varies mile to mile but if there is a break in the clouds you will be able to see it,” he said.


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