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GAA, soccer, rugby and horse racing fall foul of rough weather

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A general view as Ireland and Wales players prepare to scrum during the Women's Six Nations Rugby Championship match between Ireland and Wales at Energia Park in Dublin. Photo: Ramsey Cardy/Sportsfile

A general view as Ireland and Wales players prepare to scrum during the Women's Six Nations Rugby Championship match between Ireland and Wales at Energia Park in Dublin. Photo: Ramsey Cardy/Sportsfile

A general view as Ireland and Wales players prepare to scrum during the Women's Six Nations Rugby Championship match between Ireland and Wales at Energia Park in Dublin. Photo: Ramsey Cardy/Sportsfile

Storm Ciara played havoc with Ireland's sports and cultural fixtures over the past 48 hours.

The opening ceremony for Galway's European Capital of Culture programme was cancelled amid public safety fears over the high winds while GAA, soccer, rugby and horse racing events were also thrown into chaos.

Horse Racing Ireland postponed yesterday's Punchestown race meeting to tomorrow due to water-logging at the track.

All camogie matches were cancelled while a number of Lidl national football league matches were also called off.

Amongst the matches cancelled was the League 2 clash between Laois and Cavan with the pitch at O'Moore Park left waterlogged following torrential overnight rain.

In rugby, a number of club games were called off due to the weather conditions, including all Leinster branch matches.

In soccer, the League of Ireland curtain raiser fell victim to the awful conditions.

The President's Cup match between Dundalk and Shamrock Rovers was postponed amid safety concerns.

Discussions will take place on setting a new date for the match.

Storm Ciara also made her presence felt across the Irish Sea where Manchester City's Premier League match against West Ham was postponed due to "extreme and escalating weather conditions".

Meanwhile Scotland's Women's Six Nations rugby match against England was among other games cancelled.

Irish Independent