Monday 23 July 2018

Holly Carpenter: 'Those feminazis should give the Rose of Tralee girls a break'

Holly Carpenter (inset) and Dáithí Ó Sé with the Roses at Malahide Castle in Dublin for the launch of this year’s Rose of Tralee. Photo: Domnick Walsh
Holly Carpenter (inset) and Dáithí Ó Sé with the Roses at Malahide Castle in Dublin for the launch of this year’s Rose of Tralee. Photo: Domnick Walsh
Rose of Tralee Contestants Derby Rose Sarah Kelly, Florida Rose Elizabeth Marnice during a introduction of the 65 International Roses hoping to make it through to the 2017 International Rose Television Selections on RTE One at Malahide Castle, Dublin. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins
Miss World 2011...Miss Republic of Ireland Holly Carpenter in central London ahead of the Miss World ceremony on November 6 in Earls Court. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday October 31, 2011. The competition is in its 60th year. Photo credit should read: Sean Dempsey/PA Wire...A

Holly Carpenter

Earlier in the week, Daithi O Se introduced the 64 lovely ladies of the 2017 Rose of Tralee International Festival.

The Roses were at Malahide castle, wearing sashes and coordinated red dresses.

This year will mark the seventh time Daithi (right) will MC the annual event. The showman is again looking forward to interviewing all the contestants.

He said: “One of the things I really enjoy every year is meeting them all and then seeing how they get on. My main job is to make sure that all the Roses feel safe and secure there and that I’m a friendly face when they walk out.”

Rose of Tralee Contestants Derby Rose Sarah Kelly, Florida Rose Elizabeth Marnice during a introduction of the 65 International Roses hoping to make it through to the 2017 International Rose Television Selections on RTE One at Malahide Castle, Dublin. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins
Rose of Tralee Contestants Derby Rose Sarah Kelly, Florida Rose Elizabeth Marnice during a introduction of the 65 International Roses hoping to make it through to the 2017 International Rose Television Selections on RTE One at Malahide Castle, Dublin. Photo: Gareth Chaney Collins

The Rose of Tralee is an event that divides the nation. Some people are of the opinion that it’s outdated and has lost its relevance. Others see it as a bit of good-natured, harmless fun and entertaining TV.

Whether you love it or hate it, I feel it’s hard not to switch it on each year, even just for a quick peek.

I find the commentary on my Twitter timeline more fun than the show itself. I’m often surprised by the people who end up watching it, but at this stage it’s such an iconic event that it’s entertaining in its own way.

As someone with a background in beauty pageants, I have to say I feel for the contestants when I see people slamming the competition and mocking the girls.

Miss World 2011...Miss Republic of Ireland Holly Carpenter in central London ahead of the Miss World ceremony on November 6 in Earls Court. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday October 31, 2011. The competition is in its 60th year. Photo credit should read: Sean Dempsey/PA Wire...A
Miss World 2011...Miss Republic of Ireland Holly Carpenter in central London ahead of the Miss World ceremony on November 6 in Earls Court. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Monday October 31, 2011. The competition is in its 60th year. Photo credit should read: Sean Dempsey/PA Wire...A

There are times when some things are too funny not to comment on. For example, Twitter exploded in 2015 when the Dublin Rose broke out into a hip-hop dance along to LMFAO’s Party Rock Anthem.

One thing I really can’t stand, though, is that the Rose of Tralee gives the feminazis so much ammunition.

“Feminazi” is a term for a breed of feminists with extreme and often contradictory opinions on women’s rights.

I would count myself as a feminist because I believe women deserve equality and the right to make their own life choices.

For women to slate any of these girls for entering a pageant goes against telling women they can do as they choose.

I remember receiving a bit of grief online when I was representing Ireland at Miss World. People were saying the competition was sexist, outdated and degrading towards women.

Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but the three weeks I spent with my fellow contestants at Miss World was one of the most empowering experiences of my life.

I was there by choice and it made me feel good about myself, which is how the Rose of Tralee must make these young women feel too.

Herald

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