| 18.2°C Dublin

Close

Premium

Statement dressers: “I did try to do the whole ‘blend in and don’t make waves’ thing, but that has never been me”

With our restrictive past behind us, men’s fashion has become a means of self-expression and individuality. We asked four of Ireland’s best-dressed men about standing out from the crowd

Close

(Left to Right) Anthony Mooney, Timi Ogunyemi, Arthur Gourolunlian, Jerry Fish Picture by Alex Sheridan

(Left to Right) Anthony Mooney, Timi Ogunyemi, Arthur Gourolunlian, Jerry Fish Picture by Alex Sheridan

Jerry Fish: “As a performer, and in rock and roll in particular, the look is as important as the music." Picture by Alex Sheridan

Jerry Fish: “As a performer, and in rock and roll in particular, the look is as important as the music." Picture by Alex Sheridan

Jerry wears: Jacket; shirt; tie, all found in thrift shops in Dublin, Cork and New York. Trousers, All Saints. Shoes, Crockett & Jones. Picture by Alex Sheridan

Jerry wears: Jacket; shirt; tie, all found in thrift shops in Dublin, Cork and New York. Trousers, All Saints. Shoes, Crockett & Jones. Picture by Alex Sheridan

"Back in the 1980s, when kids like me were finding our look, we had no money and so we would make up our own style by shopping in second-hand stores." Picture by Alex Sheridan

"Back in the 1980s, when kids like me were finding our look, we had no money and so we would make up our own style by shopping in second-hand stores." Picture by Alex Sheridan

Timi Ogunyemi Picture by Alex Sheridan

Timi Ogunyemi Picture by Alex Sheridan

Timi wears: Coach jacket; oversized sweatshirt, both Comme des Garçons; bag, Supreme, all Dover Street Market, London. Denim trousers, Zara. Fluorescent sneakers, Balenciaga Balenciaga, London. Picture by Alex Sheridan

Timi wears: Coach jacket; oversized sweatshirt, both Comme des Garçons; bag, Supreme, all Dover Street Market, London. Denim trousers, Zara. Fluorescent sneakers, Balenciaga Balenciaga, London. Picture by Alex Sheridan

"Online, I spend way too much time looking at Balenciaga, Daily Paper, Yeezy Gap and Ivy Park." Picture by Alex Sheridan

"Online, I spend way too much time looking at Balenciaga, Daily Paper, Yeezy Gap and Ivy Park." Picture by Alex Sheridan

Anthony Mooney Picture by Alex Sheridan

Anthony Mooney Picture by Alex Sheridan

Anthony wears: Shirt, Balenciaga spring/summer 2018. Trousers,Marni spring/summer 2019. Trainers, 2014 Riccardo Tisci X Air Force 1, Nike. Picture by Alex Sheridan

Anthony wears: Shirt, Balenciaga spring/summer 2018. Trousers,Marni spring/summer 2019. Trainers, 2014 Riccardo Tisci X Air Force 1, Nike. Picture by Alex Sheridan

Arthur Gourounlian. Picture by Alex Sheridan

Arthur Gourounlian. Picture by Alex Sheridan

Arthur wears: Jacket, Zara. Shirt, Penneys/Primark. Jeans, D&G. Trainers, Puma. Glasses, Tom Ford. Socks, The AG Socks. Picture by Alex Sheridan

Arthur wears: Jacket, Zara. Shirt, Penneys/Primark. Jeans, D&G. Trainers, Puma. Glasses, Tom Ford. Socks, The AG Socks. Picture by Alex Sheridan

/

(Left to Right) Anthony Mooney, Timi Ogunyemi, Arthur Gourolunlian, Jerry Fish Picture by Alex Sheridan

As a teenage music fan in rural Wicklow in the mid-1980s, I was deeply enamoured with the whole goth-light look sported by Robert Smith of The Cure, Jim and William Reid of The Jesus and Mary Chain, and Ian McCulloch of Echo & the Bunnymen. Back then, your tribe was everything, and what you wore advertised your musical tastes in a way that today’s teenagers would probably find hard to fathom. Proper 1980s’ goths were scary — with their 18-hole Dr Martens, white faces and shiny PVC — while Cureheads were somewhat cuddly by comparison.

The look I was after mostly consisted of ripped grey jeans, oversized boot runners, a white shirt and a dinner jacket. At the very least, this was topped off by backcombed hair and, if you were really committed, ruby-red lipstick. For women, the look was pretty much the same, perhaps with the addition of some purple paisley.


Most Watched





Privacy