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'If u love Meg please call' - Harry's texts to Meghan's estranged dad revealed

Court papers unveiled ahead of hearing as couple cut off British tabloids

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Appeals: Court papers claim Meghan and Harry tried to contact her father

Appeals: Court papers claim Meghan and Harry tried to contact her father

PA

Appeals: Court papers claim Meghan and Harry tried to contact her father

Meghan Markle has laid bare emotional text messages from her and Prince Harry to her father as they pleaded with him to contact them before their wedding, as she embarks on a court case against a British newspaper.

Meghan, who is suing the 'Mail on Sunday' over the publication of a letter to her father in 2018, has filed court documents spelling out the family's interaction with Thomas Markle, with messages pleading with him to accept help and stop speaking to the press.

The messages to Mr Markle, who had been admitted to hospital with chest pains and did not fly to England for their wedding on May 19 2018, include an offer by the couple to send security to help him, a plea for him to him to "please, please" get in touch, and from Harry: "If u love Meg and want to make it right please call me."

The paperwork, filed before the first court hearing on Friday, shows Meghan's legal team laying out its argument against the 'Mail on Sunday', which in August 2018 published extracts from a letter she had sent to her estranged father.

In it, she accused Mr Markle of breaking her heart "into a million pieces".

The court documents were made public a day after Harry and Meghan wrote to a selection of British tabloid newspapers to tell them there would be "no corroboration and zero engagement" with them from now on.

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Tensions: Thomas Markle has spoken to the press about Meghan

Tensions: Thomas Markle has spoken to the press about Meghan

Tensions: Thomas Markle has spoken to the press about Meghan

"What they won't do is offer themselves up as currency for an economy of clickbait and distortion," they said in a letter to the editors of the 'Daily Mail', 'Sun', 'Daily Mirror' and 'Daily Express'.

The couple are now living in Los Angeles, with paparazzi pictures of them walking their dog and undertaking food deliveries being shared around the world. Yesterday, 'Good Morning America', the country's most-watched breakfast show, aired "exclusive" footage of Meghan being interviewed about 'Elephants', the film she has narrated.

In the case against the 'Mail on Sunday', Meghan is seeking unspecified damages relating to claims of breach of copyright, data protection and privacy under Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights.

It begins in the High Court in London on Friday with a strikeout hearing, after which the trial is not likely to get under way until the end of the year.

The contents of the letter were published in a "highly manipulated, sensational and deliberately inflammatory way" which "deeply upset" Meghan, her legal team says.

Associated Newspapers, publishers of the 'Mail on Sunday', has said it would defend the claim "vigorously", categorically denying the letter was edited in "any way that changed its meaning".

The newspaper has argued that the handwritten letter was given to them by Mr Markle to set the record straight after its existence was made public in an interview given to the US celebrity magazine 'People' by five of Meghan's close friends.

Meghan denies that she authorised the interview, saying she was "distressed" after learning the "deeply private" letter had been mentioned.

In a new submission, Meghan's legal team contests what they call the "tendentious and highly partial" description of her contact with her father, saying they would therefore lay out the "full exchanges".

They took place after he had been exposed as collaborating with paparazzi from his home in Mexico, and while he had been admitted to hospital with chest pains before their wedding. (© Daily Telegraph, London)

Telegraph.co.uk