Thursday 23 January 2020

How Harry and Meghan's decision hit newspaper headlines on other side of the Atlantic

Meghan, Duchess of Sussex and Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex depart Canada House on January 07, 2020 in London, England. (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)
Meghan, Duchess of Sussex and Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex depart Canada House on January 07, 2020 in London, England. (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)

Tom Pilgrim

Harry and Meghan's decision to step back as senior royals has made newspaper headlines on the other side of the Atlantic where the couple intend to spend part of their time.

In the US, the Chicago Tribune tweeted a link to their coverage, writing: "Northwestern graduate moving closer to home after spending time abroad."

The tongue-in-cheek line refers to Meghan's previous studies at the university, which has a Chicago campus.

The New York Post's front page pokes fun at the couple, featuring a mocked-up image of them looking dishevelled and drinking on a sofa.

Its headline reads "Meghan and Harry leave royals for 'commoner' life".

Its website dedicates several articles to the royal couple's announcement, asking questions about their finances and where they will live.

"The family will still need a full security detail to follow them around North America," a piece suggested.

Another story quoted unnamed sources saying Harry and Meghan will set up home in Los Angeles.

Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex depart Canada House on January 07, 2020 in London, England. (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)
Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex depart Canada House on January 07, 2020 in London, England. (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)

Celebrity magazine US Weekly featured a comment from the duchess's father Thomas Markle, who said he was "disappointed" by the couple's decision.

The Washington Post said the couple's plans to move abroad would be "bold and remarkable".

It added that it signalled "two of the younger, more popular royals may be fed up with an anachronistic, cosseted life of endless ribbon-cutting and fusty, scripted engagements - and the scrutiny that comes with all of that".

A comment piece in the New York Times said Harry and Meghan's desire to "break free from royal traditions... speaks directly to the challenges facing the monarchy as the reign of the queen, now 93, enters its final years".

'Transition': Prince Harry and Meghan Markle wish to raise son Archie in both the UK and North America. Photo: Reuters
'Transition': Prince Harry and Meghan Markle wish to raise son Archie in both the UK and North America. Photo: Reuters

It said the couple face a "tricky balancing act" of remaining part of the royal family "while also being somehow outside it at the same time".

Focusing on Meghan's treatment by the British press, it argued that she had been portrayed as "inferior" to the Duchess of Cambridge and a "ungrateful royal bride".

The European version of USA Today's website features an extensive Q&A, asking in its headline: "What are Harry and Meghan thinking?"

In Canada, where the duke and duchess recently enjoyed a six-week break in British Columbia, a Toronto Star opinion piece led with the headline: "Harry and Meghan, you're finally free - now come to Canada, where you belong."

In another article, the paper noted speculation the couple could move to Toronto, where former actress Meghan filmed the TV series Suits, or Vancouver.

The Globe and Mail newspaper, based in Toronto, initially had more muted coverage on its website.

An article on the royal couple highlighted their comments praising the beauty of Canada and speculation they could move to the country.

PA Media

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