Tuesday 18 September 2018

'Five years of working on Crime Call will teach you to lock the door,' says Gráinne Seoige on safety in South Africa

Grainne Seoige
Grainne Seoige
Television personality: Grainne Seoige and her partner Leon Jordaan Photo: Gerry Mooney
Grainne Seoige at the Galway Races. Picture: Tony Gavin
Independent.ie Newsdesk

Independent.ie Newsdesk

TV presenter Gráinne Seoige is settling in well to life in South Africa with fiancé Leon Jordaan, but doesn't take any chances when it comes to safety.

The former afternoon host (43) said she feels especially clued-in to being cautious thanks to her years as host of RTE's Crime Call, so she's always "vigilant" while out and about in her adopted home of Pretoria.

Grainne Seoige at the Galway Races. Picture: Tony Gavin
Grainne Seoige at the Galway Races. Picture: Tony Gavin

"I think you definitely have to be vigilant. I would be like that anyway. I mean, I wouldn’t be walking around with my handbag open. When I get into the car, I lock the door. But I do that here. Five years of working on Crime Call, will also teach you to lock the door. I’m the daughter of a garda as well," she told Irish Country Magazine.

Seoige, who is now working as a diamond dealer, said she got the inspiration for her new career when her rugby coach other half popped the question in 2013.

"When Leon proposed, he said, 'I’d like to make the ring in South Africa'. I’d never heard of this before," she explained.

"I thought you went into a jewellery store, you handed over a wad of money, and you got a ring: 'I’ll have ring number 15 please', but he said, '"No, that’s not what we do.'"

Television personality: Grainne Seoige and her partner Leon Jordaan Photo: Gerry Mooney
Television personality: Grainne Seoige and her partner Leon Jordaan Photo: Gerry Mooney

Gráinne upped sticks from Ireland in 2014, but still flies home to Dublin occasionally for media jobs and she's picked up Afrikaans, adding another language to her already impressive linguistic skill set.

"It would be like if you were with a French guy, you’d try. Their families speak Afrikaans to each other," she said.

"We’d be the same, we’d speak Irish if we’re chatting amongst ourselves at home. So, what I’ve found is that everybody speaks English, but then they slip into it; it’s what they’re more comfortable speaking. It’s not easy, but I’ve concentrated on doing it.

"I haven’t had any formal lessons now, but I’m picking it up. It’s quite like Irish because the one thing they do is they roll their Rs."

Online Editors

Style Newsletter

Stay on top of the latest fashion, beauty and celeb gossip in our Style newsletter.

Also in this section