| 2.5°C Dublin

Close

Premium

The great anti-ageing myth: the price we pay for our obsession with staying young

Is 50 really the new 40? Is it possible to hold back the tide of years with superfoods, Botox and resistance training? Yes, we are living longer, but are we actually healthier into old age? Emily Hourican looks at whether ageing is now optional, or if our belief in Forever Young is just self-delusion

Close

Cindy Crawford attends the Chanel show as part of the Paris Fashion Week Womenswear  Spring/Summer 2018 on October 3, 2017 in Paris, France.  (Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images)

Cindy Crawford attends the Chanel show as part of the Paris Fashion Week Womenswear Spring/Summer 2018 on October 3, 2017 in Paris, France. (Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images)

Exuberant beauty: Cindy Crawford

Exuberant beauty: Cindy Crawford

Keanu Reeves

Keanu Reeves

Bruce Willis

Bruce Willis

Denzel Washington

Denzel Washington

Edna O'Brien

Edna O'Brien

Helen Mirren

Helen Mirren

Mary O'Rourke

Mary O'Rourke

Meryl Streep

Meryl Streep

Daniel Day Lewis

Daniel Day Lewis

/

Cindy Crawford attends the Chanel show as part of the Paris Fashion Week Womenswear Spring/Summer 2018 on October 3, 2017 in Paris, France. (Photo by Pascal Le Segretain/Getty Images)

Is it just me, or is getting older starting to seem a bit... lax? A bit sloppy? A bit like you didn’t commit? Perhaps it’s because everything we eat, every cream or serum we put on our faces and bodies, many forms of exercise, hobbies, even gardening and colouring books (I’m not kidding), now promise to be' anti-ageing.'

My eight-year-old daughter smeared on some cheap own-brand supermarket sunscreen a while ago. “So,”


Most Watched





Privacy