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Tottenham fans urged to stop using Jewish slur

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Tottenham say they have a 'zero-tolerance position' regarding anti-Semitism, but insist that their fans' use of that word has never been 'intended to cause offence'

Tottenham say they have a 'zero-tolerance position' regarding anti-Semitism, but insist that their fans' use of that word has never been 'intended to cause offence'

Tottenham say they have a 'zero-tolerance position' regarding anti-Semitism, but insist that their fans' use of that word has never been 'intended to cause offence'

Tottenham Hotspur are facing fresh calls to clamp down on fans using the word 'yid' after a series of Jewish organisations condemned the common-usage slur at football grounds.

The Community Security Trust, the Jewish Leadership Council and Action Against Discrimination have all said they want Spurs to change their stance on the issue following Friday's statement from World Jewish Congress and the Board of Deputies of British Jews calling on Tottenham to "take a stand" against its own supporters using the word.

Tottenham say they have a "zero-tolerance position" regarding anti-Semitism, but insist that their fans' use of that word has never been "intended to cause offence".

Spurs face Chelsea in the League Cup semi-final tonight, a fixture that has been stained by anti-Semitism in recent years.

That anti-Semitism, mainly directed by Chelsea fans to Spurs fans because of Spurs' historic Jewish links, prompted Chelsea to launch a 'Say No to Antisemitism' campaign earlier this year.

Chelsea have been working with the Holocaust Educational Trust to educate fans who have behaved in an anti-Semitic way in the past.

Fresh attention has turned to the prevalence of the word 'yid' in English football.

The word, a derogatory anti-Semitic slur, has long been adopted by Tottenham fans, in recognition of the club's Jewish heritage.

Tottenham Hotspur have traditionally defended the right of all of their fans, Jewish and non-Jewish, to do this and to reclaim the word as a 'badge of honour'.

This has long been opposed by vocal segments of the Jewish community and on Friday Robert Singer, the CEO of the World Jewish Congress, put pressure on Tottenham to crack down on the usage of the word, even when it is used by Spurs fans about themselves, rather than as an insult directed at someone else.

"(The use of the word 'yid') by fans in the stands, either as a self-designated nickname or as a slogan against rivals must not be tolerated in any way," Singer said in a statement. "We would also ask Tottenham Hotspur to take a stand against the use of 'Yid Army', 'Yid' and 'Yiddos' by their fans. Such a long overdue action is important to kick anti-Semitism off the pitch and create a welcoming environment for all."

Independent News Service