Thursday 14 December 2017

Newcastle under fire for accepting 'loan shark' sponsorship

Martin Hardy

Newcastle United's £24m shirt sponsorship deal with short-term moneylenders Wonga was engulfed in fresh controversy last night when the club's Muslim players were warned that wearing the new shirts would infringe Sharia law.

The intervention from the Muslim Council of Britain will heap further pressure on the club as it seeks to deflect widespread criticism after unveiling a four-year deal with the short-term loan company.

Of the Newcastle team who took the field against Manchester United on Sunday, four are practising Muslims -- Demba Ba, Papiss Cisse, Cheick Tiote and Hatem Ben Arfa.

Wonga, whose deal to succeed Virgin Money begins next season, has drawn criticism for the level of interest charged on its 30-day loans. If a Newcastle supporter took out a loan to purchase a £49.99 club shirt, they would have to repay £71.92 after one month -- a rate that would be equivalent to 4,212pc over a year.

The club did its best to offset criticism of the new deal by announcing that the Sports Direct Arena would revert to its original name of St James' Park. Wonga also promised to invest heavily in Newcastle's academy and the club's foundation scheme, which helps 15 and 16-year-olds find work.

attack

However, the deal drew a stinging attack from Nick Forbes, the leader of Newcastle City Council, who said: "I'm appalled and sickened that they would sign a deal with a legal loan shark. It's a sad indictment of the profit-at-any-price culture at Newcastle United.

"We are fighting hard to tackle legal and illegal loan sharking and having a company like this right across the city on every football shirt that's sold undermines all our work."

Under Sharia law, a Muslim is not allowed to benefit from lending money or receiving money from someone. This means that earning interest is not allowed. To comply, interest is not paid on Islamic savings or current accounts or applied to Islamic mortgages.

Shaykh Ibrahim Mogra, assistant secretary general of the MCB, said: "There are two aspects to this. We have the rulings of the religious law and we have the individual's choice and decision on how they want to follow or not follow that rule. The idea is to protect the vulnerable and the needy from exploitation by the rich and powerful."

Former Spurs striker Frederic Kanoute refused to wear the 888.com logo of the gambling website when he was with Seville in La Liga because of his religious beliefs.

He was allowed to play games for Seville with an unbranded shirt but had to wear the logo on his training equipment. (© Independent News Service)

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