Monday 27 May 2019

John Aldridge: 'Reaction to Jurgen Klopp's celebration an example of what's wrong with the modern world'

Liverpool's German manager Jurgen Klopp embraces Liverpool's Belgian striker Divock Origi on the pitch after the English Premier League football match between Liverpool and Everton at Anfield in Liverpool, north west England on December 2, 2018. - Liverpool won the game 1-0. (Photo by Oli SCARFF / AFP)
Liverpool's German manager Jurgen Klopp embraces Liverpool's Belgian striker Divock Origi on the pitch after the English Premier League football match between Liverpool and Everton at Anfield in Liverpool, north west England on December 2, 2018. - Liverpool won the game 1-0. (Photo by Oli SCARFF / AFP)

John Aldridge

Jurgen Klopp didn't need to be punished too heavily for his celebrations at the end of the Merseyside derby on Sunday and I'm glad he has paid an £8,000 fine and the matter is now closed.

After witnessing his side score an injury-time winner at the end of a Merseyside derby that means so much to both sets of fans, he was always likely to show some excitement and get carried away by the moment.

Some will say he needs to control his emotions, but you put yourself in his position and ask yourself if you could stand there and clap politely after such a dramatic goal?

He meant no harm running on as he did seconds after one of the most remarkable finishes you will ever see to win a derby game and listening to the Everton manager Marco Silva after the game, he didn't seem too bothered by the actions of his rival, so let's not get carried away here.

Too many people are looking to be offended in the modern world and this is another example of a situation that doesn't really need to be punished being highlighted by people who go out of their way to declare how upset they are.

The bigger picture has to be that Liverpool got lucky with the final act of what was a very entertaining game against a much-improved Everton side who have clearly taken several strides forward since they came to Anfield last season, where they did little more than try to keep the score down.

Sam Allardyce's brand of anti-football was never going to get them anywhere and I like what I saw from Marco Silva's side at the weekend. In fact, I'd go as far as to say Everton are the most impressive team we have seen at Anfield this season and I would include Manchester City in the list, after Pep Guardiola's side came with a very cautious approach.

Everton had a couple of big chances to score and they could have secured a first win at Anfield since 1999 if one of those had been converted, but the win was vital for Klopp and his team amid what appears to be an increasingly tough battle to stay with Manchester City at the top of the table.

Guardiola's side keep winning and it means the pressure is on Liverpool to try and replicate their results, which is a tough challenge in a Premier League that has so many teams capable of causing upsets.

Liverpool now have away games at Burnley (tomorrow) and Bournemouth (Saturday) before a massive Champions League game against Napoli and a home match against Manchester United, with nothing less than wins in all of those matches good enough for Klopp.

The need to win every single game is a pressure few teams have managed to successfully deal with down the years, but the standards Manchester City are setting are so high and Liverpool have to try and live up to them.

The big plus they have on their side is an ability to keep clean sheets, as this is giving them a platform to win matches when they are not at their best and we saw evidence of this once again in the Everton game.

Alisson, Virgil van Dijk and Joe Gomez were excellent on Sunday and while Liverpool rode their luck at times, their defence has improved so much in the last 12 months and it means they are getting a chance to win games in the final stages.

Their record of winning matches in the closing minutes is better than any other side in the Premier League and they might need a few more of those late, late shows if they are to have any chance of staying in the race for a Premier League title against champions who don't look like slipping up any time soon.

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