Tuesday 24 April 2018

European misery means United must go shopping

Ian Herbert

This time, Alex Ferguson stared defeat square in the face.

It was six years ago yesterday that he absented himself entirely from press questions when his side's Champions League group-stage elimination at the stadium known to Benfica's fans simply as Luz (Light) had plunged him into darkness. Now, he gazed out on the foul storm clouds scudding above the back fields of Carrington and smiled.

Removal from the continent's elite tournament at the group stage is still a relatively unknown concept to this manager. It has only happened three times and not once since Benfica, though there is perhaps a consolation of sorts in a landscape more sparing now than that of December 2005 when, to quote one chronicler of United's dismal 2-1 defeat in Portugal, the consensus was that Ferguson's "old well of venom and resilience has run dry".

Water off a duck's back, now. "I don't think anyone relishes seeing criticism of themselves," Ferguson reflected yesterday.

"I've said it time and time again, you only need to lose two games and the hounds are out, there's no question about that."

His belief in the promise of youth has become far more messianic since he last found himself in this position and he affirmed yet again that the boys would be alright.

"They've achieved many great things so far," he said. "Chris Smalling and Phil Jones have played for their country, Danny Welbeck has played for his country. These will be the foundation of the club in a few years' time.

"And what they got, these young players, was a nasty experience on Wednesday, but they know they have the trust of myself and the coaches. They will not be hounded because of one bad performance. And time will prove us right."

Time has proved something else, however. Though Ferguson was his usual pessimistic self yesterday about the value of the transfer market in January, Champions League group-stage failure has always been a catalyst for action.

It happened in '95, when Paul Ince, Mark Hughes and Andrei Kanchelskis left to make way for the new generation of young bloods; in 2005, when the indignity of winding up bottom of a Champions League group immediately preceded Ferguson's moves for Patrice Evra and Nemanja Vidic.

The same pattern can be traced to the spring of 2001, when defeats, home and away, to Bayern Munich led Roy Keane -- Ferguson's harshest critic in Basel on Wednesday -- to conclude that "maybe we need to get new players, break it up, start again".

Ferguson promptly broke the British transfer record twice in one summer, paying £28m to Lazio for Juan Sebastian Veron to break forward from a more fortified midfield and bringing in Ruud van Nistelrooy as a lone striker.

The reconstruction has not always worked. Veron never succeeded as a United player and though Van Nistelrooy's goalscoring for United in Europe has no equal, the club drifted into a period of Champions League wilderness after 2002.

But this is another United in transition and the close attention being paid to Benfica duo Nicolas Gaitan and Javi Garcia suggests that winter rebuilding work should not be ruled out.

"I just have to repeat myself. It's very difficult to buy players in January," Ferguson said, not entirely precluding activity.

"If we're going to buy, you want someone who makes a difference, and that's what we've tried to do."

This is not to say that Ferguson does not possess talent within. Paul Scholes has said that last season's FA Youth Cup-winning side are the best crop of Old Trafford youngsters since those of his own era, and the Europa League may just offer an opportunity to blood Ravel Morrison, Paul Pogba and others.

Ferguson did not exclude that option, either, though it will be contingent on the strength of opposition in the Europa League and the Premier League opposition to follow.

"I think we will have a go at it, there's no doubt in my mind," he said. "There's a responsibility at this club to do well in every tournament. But it depends who you're drawn against and what your next league game is."

Briefly, an enthusiasm actually seemed to building for the Europa League -- and one which did not seem forced. In the back of Ferguson's mind, there might just be a thought that the Uefa Cup is the one European trophy to have eluded him.

Word had even reached him, just yesterday morning, that the tournament may not even mean Thursday nights on Channel 5. His side's fixtures might be moved to Tuesdays or Wednesdays, owing to the fact that teams from the same city may not play at home on the same day and that the two Manchester clubs -- both seeded -- will play second legs at home.

"I don't know the full impact of that," said the manager, who may not be exuberant to know that, since Europa League matches cannot clash with the Champions League, kick-offs could be 5.0 -- taking United a long way from the fervour of the great Old Trafford European nights.

For now, though, the small matter of the five-point gap on Manchester City and the potential, as he sees it, of exerting some pressure on successive weekends, with United twice playing before City -- starting today, at home to Wolves.

With nine players injured, Ferguson is in a cold place, though one of his prime strategies has been to turn adversity into a source of strength.

"The work we're doing here is the right work," he said. "The players we've got here are the right players. We're not the only club in the world that can get a bad result. How you recover from them is part of our club."

And at the very moment he left, the clouds cleared. (© Independent News Service)

Manchester United v Wolves,

Live, Setanta Sports 1, 3.0

Irish Independent

Sport Newsletter

The best sport action straight to your inbox every morning.

Editor's Choice

Also in Sport