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The League of Ireland needs to move with caution to avoid disaster

Daniel McDonnell


There is a natural desire to get professionals back to work but one wrong step will derail it

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Testing times: A general view of Richmond Park yesterday after St Patrick's Athletic announced the club is having to temporarily lay off its staff. Photo: Harry Murphy/Sportsfile

Testing times: A general view of Richmond Park yesterday after St Patrick's Athletic announced the club is having to temporarily lay off its staff. Photo: Harry Murphy/Sportsfile

SPORTSFILE

Testing times: A general view of Richmond Park yesterday after St Patrick's Athletic announced the club is having to temporarily lay off its staff. Photo: Harry Murphy/Sportsfile

Even in the midst of a pandemic which should function as a uniting force, the deep inequality within Irish football poses a serious problem for the authorities.

The idea of getting all parties together to craft a plan which plots a roadmap towards a form of business as usual is complicated by the fact that the League of Ireland is packed with businesses that operate in very different ways.

A full-time club with players on 52-week contracts, and potentially lucrative European games at the end of July, is hardly on the same page as a team with part-time players that have no real incentive to rush back to action once Government schemes are in place.