| 3.5°C Dublin

‘You need to get wins and that's the end of it’ – Jayson Molumby admits Ireland must learn lessons from Nations League campaign

Close

Ireland's Jayson Molumby after the UEFA Nations League defeat to Scotland at Hampden Park in Glasgow, Scotland. Photo by Eóin Noonan/Sportsfile

Ireland's Jayson Molumby after the UEFA Nations League defeat to Scotland at Hampden Park in Glasgow, Scotland. Photo by Eóin Noonan/Sportsfile

Ireland's Jayson Molumby after the UEFA Nations League defeat to Scotland at Hampden Park in Glasgow, Scotland. Photo by Eóin Noonan/Sportsfile

Jayson Molumby admits that the Republic of Ireland need to learn lessons from their last two Nations League games and turn positive performances into points in the group table.

Ireland led 1-0 away to Scotland thanks to John Egan's first half goal but a goal from Jack Hendry and a Ryan Christie penalty won it for Scotland who now look to top the Nations League group while Ireland face into a game on Tuesday aware that defeat could lead to relegation. In the previous game Ireland also led at the break but conceded early in the second half and dropped costly points.

"You can learn lessons but it doesn't really matter if you don't get wins, you need to get wins and that's the end of it," says Molumby.

"It's disappointing as the last two games, especially away from home, we deserved a win.

"The game plan against Ukraine was down to a tee, maybe should have held on but started the second half slowly, same here tonight, game plan we had down to a tee but at the start of the second half, probably a ten minute spell where they put on a bit of pressure and it cost us. It's gutting.

"You go in 1-0, I felt we were in control of the game, I thought we limited them to very little and at the other end we capitalised, broke well, we were in control but started really slow in the second half which is a sickener for us," added Molumby, who praised the Irish side for coping with the pressure from a vocal home crowd.

"I don't feel like there was much pressure from our side, the feeling out there, even though the fans were going to be aggressive I didn't feel pressure on the pitch, they had stints on the ball but they weren't really doing anything with it.

"I thought our shape and our set-up was spot on. It was ten minutes of losing our composure at the start of the second half," he added.

The Halfway Line Newsletter

Get the lowdown on the Irish football scene with our soccer correspondent Daniel McDonnell and expert team of writers with our free weekly newsletter.

This field is required


Most Watched





Privacy