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Michael Robinson was a central figure in an effort which has never really been given its due

Eamonn Sweeney


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Michael Robinson (l) celebrates with Frank Stapleton after scoring Ireland's third goal against France in the 1982 World Cup qualifier at Lansdowne Road on October 14 1981. Photo: Ray McManus

Michael Robinson (l) celebrates with Frank Stapleton after scoring Ireland's third goal against France in the 1982 World Cup qualifier at Lansdowne Road on October 14 1981. Photo: Ray McManus

SPORTSFILE

Michael Robinson (l) celebrates with Frank Stapleton after scoring Ireland's third goal against France in the 1982 World Cup qualifier at Lansdowne Road on October 14 1981. Photo: Ray McManus

The run which set up Ireland's first goal in the October 1981 World Cup qualifying match against France was the quintessential Michael Robinson moment.

When the ball breaks to Robinson just inside the French half, his immediate impulse is to go straight at the defence. As he approaches the penalty area he takes the brave decision to push the ball past the lunging Maxime Bossis.

It leaves him wide open to being clattered, but instead Robinson evades the challenge and Bossis collides Keystone Kops style with Gerard Janvion to leave the way clear.