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'Fear of losing, fear of not succeeding, drove me to top'

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Roy Keane during a book launch at the Aviva Stadium, Dublin, Ireland. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Thursday October 9, 2014. See PA story SOCCER Republic. Photo credit should read Niall Carson/PA Wire.

Roy Keane during a book launch at the Aviva Stadium, Dublin, Ireland. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Thursday October 9, 2014. See PA story SOCCER Republic. Photo credit should read Niall Carson/PA Wire.

Roy Keane during Ireland squad training ahead of their UEFA Euro 2016 Championship Qualifer, Group D, game against Gibraltar on Saturday. Sportsfile

Roy Keane during Ireland squad training ahead of their UEFA Euro 2016 Championship Qualifer, Group D, game against Gibraltar on Saturday. Sportsfile

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Roy Keane during a book launch at the Aviva Stadium, Dublin, Ireland. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Picture date: Thursday October 9, 2014. See PA story SOCCER Republic. Photo credit should read Niall Carson/PA Wire.

ROY Keane has admitted that fear drove him to become the best footballer he could be.

But successful motivation ultimately depends on an individual's own determination to succeed, he told a conference.

"I think you can get into people's mindset, but in terms of trying to go round and motivate people all the time, you'd be exhausted. Obviously I think people get tired of hearing you."

"I always found that what drove me on, particularly before any big game (was) fear. Fear of losing, fear of not succeeding, I always felt I was representing my family," Keane said.

Both threats and encouragement should be part of a manager's arsenal if they want to motivate their players or staff, according to the Republic of Ireland assistant manager.

"Every now and again of course, particularly before team talks, before a game, you can inspire them. I was lucky with Alex Ferguson, I think one of his biggest strengths is team talks … every team talk I thought: 'Yeah I like that'."

Keane was speaking at the Irish Management Institute's National Management Conference. He was joined by Republic of Ireland manager Martin O'Neill, who said he briefly managed a pensions company in the late 1980s.

Motivate

"It was really interesting because I was up there trying to motivate people to do a job I very obviously couldn't do myself," O'Neill said.

"I got great confidence from it I must admit, to actually stand up and speak to people and not have a clue what I was talking about."

O'Neill said that as a young man, he never considered entering management.

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"Playing football is the best thing you'll ever do ... you ask anybody. Let's say Brian O'Driscoll is standing here thinking about maybe going into coaching, I'm sure it's great, it's lovely, it's fantastic, and you get some sort of pleasure out of it, but playing is the ultimate."

Keane said management training courses didn't fully prepare him for the real thing.

"I was quite naive going into it, [I] ended up dealing with a lot of people, lot of staff with marriage problems or players with gambling problems ... I had to adapt pretty quickly to that."

He rejected the suggestion that he doesn't tolerate mistakes. "Sometimes I encourage players to make mistakes because that means they're trying something ... what I wouldn't tolerate was lads not training properly.

"I'm actually quite relaxed. Until I probably do get angry."


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