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Hunt talks up McGoldrick's credentials

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David McGoldrick of Ipswich Town

David McGoldrick of Ipswich Town

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David McGoldrick of Ipswich Town

Stephen Hunt has vouched for the character and ability of his Ipswich Town team-mate David McGoldrick, who he believes has the requisite class to solve one of Martin O'Neill's striker headaches.

With Robbie Keane edging closer to retirement, O'Neill is desperate to find a reliable alternative in the striking department – and in McGoldrick, a 26-year-old forward who has scored 15 goals for Ipswich this season, he may have found one.

Born in Nottingham, McGoldrick has an Irish grandfather, and has spent the last three months tracing his roots in order to declare for Ireland.

"It is up to me to prove the link and then make myself available for selection," McGoldrick said. "And then it is up to Martin O'Neill to pick me. I would love it if he did."

And Hunt thinks O'Neill should: "David is definitely something different to what Ireland have right now. He is good at holding the ball up, he is good at coming into spaces and scoring.

''He would do really well for us and I would love to see him in the Ireland squad. Having known him for three months or so, he has the right attitude and commitment to play for Ireland."

Ipswich, meanwhile, remain committed to signing Hunt's Irish team-mate Paul Green, despite being embroiled in a lengthy argument with Leeds United on Friday, when a prospective move broke down.

Mick McCarthy, however, has made it clear he will make a second attempt to sign the midfielder, this time on loan, later this week.

"From next week on, we can sign players for 93 days which will cover us until the end of the season," said McCarthy.

Elsewhere, Wes Hoolahan – subject to three separate bids from Aston Villa in the last week of the transfer window – will be finally allowed to leave Carrow Road, but only on a loan deal to a Championship club. QPR and Nottingham Forest are interested.

Meanwhile, Keith Andrews has questioned the motives of Giovanni Trapattoni's critics. Three of Trap's former disciples, Darron Gibson, James McClean and Jon Walters, have all spoken out about the Italian's managerial style.

"When you are not involved and not starting, you need to make sure you are doing things right before you open your mouth and have any say," said Andrews.

"So certain players who I won't name can't back up what they are talking about in terms of keeping their own laundry clean. Trapattoni was far from perfect but anyone who says this was not a successful period in our history is away with the fairies."

Irish Independent