Sport Soccer

Sunday 8 December 2019

Ferguson manages to score a job at Harvard

Former Manchester United manager Alex Ferguson will teach in Harvard's executive education programme
Former Manchester United manager Alex Ferguson will teach in Harvard's executive education programme

Oliver Staley

Alex Ferguson, the man whose extraordinary success is credited with putting the gold into 'Gold Trafford' is now taking his Midas touch to Harvard Business School.

Ferguson, who retired from managing Manchester United last year, will teach in Harvard's executive education programme, the school in Boston said on its website yesterday.

Ferguson (72) is the most successful manager in British soccer with 49 trophies in 39 years and was knighted in 1999. At Manchester United, he developed players including David Beckham and Cristiano Ronaldo and won 13 league championships. He's also known for his halftime tirades dubbed "the hairdryer," and once kicked a football boot at Beckham's head, leaving a gash in his face.

"We look forward to welcoming Sir Alex Ferguson on the HBS campus to share his remarkable leadership journey," said Anita Elberse, a Harvard Business professor who developed a case study with Ferguson. Ferguson is joining Harvard for a "long-term teaching position," and will start in May with a course in the Business of Entertainment, Media and Sports programme. Ferguson and Elberse published a 2013 Harvard Business Review article together. In it, he stressed the importance of maintaining authority.

"You can't ever lose control," he said in the article. "And if any players want to take me on, to challenge my authority and control, I deal with them."

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