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Tickets for Leinster's clash with Saracens unlikely to go on public sale despite fan announcement

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Leinster Rugby does not plan on selling tickets for Saturday's Champions Cup quarter-final clash with Saracens. Photo by Ramsey Cardy/Sportsfile

Leinster Rugby does not plan on selling tickets for Saturday's Champions Cup quarter-final clash with Saracens. Photo by Ramsey Cardy/Sportsfile

SPORTSFILE

Leinster Rugby does not plan on selling tickets for Saturday's Champions Cup quarter-final clash with Saracens. Photo by Ramsey Cardy/Sportsfile

Tickets for Leinster's Heineken Champions Cup quarter-final showdown against Saracens at the Aviva Stadium on Saturday are unlikely to go on public sale, despite the government's latest directives around crowds attending games.

Independent.ie understands that while Leinster Rugby are currently exploring all options, the province do not plan to sell tickets for this weekend's European clash.

It is believed that Leinster would instead give priority to the squad's immediate family members and friends, as well as additional staff and players – many of whom missed out on attending last weekend's Guinness Pro14 final win over Ulster.

As of tomorrow, up to 200 spectators will be permitted to attend outdoor stadia with a capacity to host a minimum of 5,000 people. Venues that do not meet that criteria can host 100 spectators.

Taoiseach Micheál Martin said today there have not been any discussions about crowds of 5,000 being permitted at sporting events in Ireland's national stadia later this year.

The IRFU have formed a working group along with the FAI and GAA, which is aimed at bringing a collaborative approach to the development of a roadmap for the safe return of spectators to stadia.

The group, which will be chaired by Martin Murphy, stadium director of the Aviva Stadium, will present its plan to the Sport Expert Group, set up by Sport Ireland.

"Sport plays a hugely important role in Irish society and by working together the FAI, GAA, and the IRFU will bring their collective expertise and learning to develop a roadmap for the safe return of spectators to the sports events they love and miss deeply," Murphy said.

"The number one consideration for this group is to seek a series of protocols which would allow spectators back into sporting fixtures in a safe way, while complying fully with Government Health guidelines.

"Spectators are more than fans, they are an intrinsic part of any sporting occasion; they are the family and friends of the men and women who are representing their town, their county, their province or their country.

“They are part of the sporting culture of our nation which is so critically important to our overall well-being."

Online Editors