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Leinster second row Jack Dunne: 'I've been out as bisexual for four or five years - but not out in the media'

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Leinster second row Jack Dunne has spoken publicly about being bisexual. Photo by Brendan Moran/Sportsfile

Leinster second row Jack Dunne has spoken publicly about being bisexual. Photo by Brendan Moran/Sportsfile

Leinster second row Jack Dunne has spoken publicly about being bisexual. Photo by Brendan Moran/Sportsfile

Leinster second row Jack Dunne has spoken publicly for the first time about his bisexuality, saying that 'maybe there are some kids across the country who could do with a role model'.

The 22-year-old today took part in a Leinster Rugby panel discussion, 'Building Allies with Pride', as well as appearing on BBC's LGBT Sport Podcast, where he discussed how he first told team-mates in school.

"I've been out as bisexual for four or five years now - but not out in the media," Dunne explained.

"I kind of realised when I was 15 or 16, but you are in a school full of of teenage boys. A lot of them would say things that they wouldn't even be thinking about, but they are just doing it out of ignorance. So when you hear that you kind of just want to keep it to yourself.

"Being bisexual is almost a blessing and a curse. You can hide it way easier. You can go out with the lads and do all that stuff, but it is easier to not be true to yourself.

"Eventually, in sixth year I told one or two people and they took it really well so I decided to tell everyone and if someone has a problem with it, that's on them. It went pretty well, there were one or two people who said 'you are not bisexual, you are gay and you won't come out', but largely it was overwhelmingly positive so it was a massive weight off the shoulders when I did that."

Dunne said that today's news won't surprise his team-mates at Leinster, who have known for years, and added that he never had to tell anyone at the province as he presumed it had been known in rugby circles since he came out in school.

"I didn't really tell anyone [in Leinster], it kind spead by word of mouth," he said.

"Because I came out in sixth year, then when I went into the Leinster sub-academy, most of the people in my year in school knew, and I presumed they told the people the year ahead of them and people in the academy would find out, so by the time I was in Leinster, I presumed everyone knew. I never had to tell anyone in a professional environment."

Dunne admitted that although he is wary of becoming known as 'the bisexual rugby player', he thought it was more important to be a role model for any kids who are in a similar position.

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"It's definitely on my mind that people could be like, he is the bisexual rugby player, instead of - he is a bisexual who plays rugby. But at the same time, maybe there are some kids across the country who could do with a role model," Dunne said.


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