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Ireland to take on the best in world

Club news

Saying that Ireland is a sports mad and rugby-loving nation is somewhat of an understatement especially after this season's Grand Slam. (stock picture)
Saying that Ireland is a sports mad and rugby-loving nation is somewhat of an understatement especially after this season's Grand Slam. (stock picture)
Independent.ie Newsdesk

Independent.ie Newsdesk

Saying that Ireland is a sports mad and rugby-loving nation is somewhat of an understatement especially after this season's Grand Slam.

The support for the sport is not limited to the national and provincial able-bodied teams though.

An increased interest in, and backing for, other forms of the sport that focus on players with limited mobility is expanding the reach of the sport.

Initiatives such as the Disability Tag Rugby Programme, that runs in Leinster, and wheelchair rugby are making the game accessible to a growing group of Irish men and women.

Wheelchair rugby was founded in Canada in 1977, became an Olympic-medal sport during the 2000 Sydney Games, and is today considered to be the fastest-growing wheelchair sport in the world.

Wheelchair rugby was introduced in Ireland in 1997 by Garrett Culliton, a former rugby player who broke his neck during a game in Naas.

Five years after the game was introduced in Ireland, the team won their first trophy - the Schwaben Cup in Germany - and since then they haven't looked back.

Last month the Irish team competed at the IWRF World Championship qualifiers in Nottwill, Switzerland where they went on to win gold, beating New Zealand 50-42 in the final.

Their win secured them a spot in the World Championships in Sydney in August.

Best of luck to everyone involved as they set their sights on further success in Sydney.

Irish Independent

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