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A Super League would be perfect for Irish rugby but too many barriers stand in the way

Ruaidhri O'Connor


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Vakh Abdaladze in training with team-mates Ross Molony, left, and Scott Penny during Leinster rugby squad training at UCD ahead of the Rainbow Cup clash with Munster. Leinster could be preparing to face leading the South African club sides in next year's revamped PRO16. Photo: Brendan Moran/Sportsfile

Vakh Abdaladze in training with team-mates Ross Molony, left, and Scott Penny during Leinster rugby squad training at UCD ahead of the Rainbow Cup clash with Munster. Leinster could be preparing to face leading the South African club sides in next year's revamped PRO16. Photo: Brendan Moran/Sportsfile

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Vakh Abdaladze in training with team-mates Ross Molony, left, and Scott Penny during Leinster rugby squad training at UCD ahead of the Rainbow Cup clash with Munster. Leinster could be preparing to face leading the South African club sides in next year's revamped PRO16. Photo: Brendan Moran/Sportsfile

As European football’s elite tears itself apart in this moment of existential crisis, Irish rugby waits on word from South Africa. It is expected that the four powerhouse franchises who were supposed to come on board for the Rainbow Cup will withdraw today, leaving Leinster, Munster, Ulster and Connacht with a rather unappealing vista of an ill-conceived competition against the same old faces.

A Super League featuring the best clubs in Europe securing blue-chip television deals and guaranteed big games against top-quality opposition week in, week out?


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