| 14.6°C Dublin

Vincent Hogan: Conor McGregor's language lets both him and us down

Close

Conor McGregor salutes the crowd after defeating Denis Siver in TD Garden in Boston

Conor McGregor salutes the crowd after defeating Denis Siver in TD Garden in Boston

SPORTSFILE

Conor McGregor salutes the crowd after defeating Denis Siver in TD Garden in Boston

Conor McGregor's soaring self-regard is undoubtedly a fundamental of what now makes him, arguably, the most marketable fighter in Mixed Martial Arts.

But it would be a pity if he mistook boorishness for charisma. In the Boston octagon last weekend, he was everything that he promised to be. Outside it? His post-fight press conference was such a clunking exhibition of expletive-laden machismo, he came across as one of two things.

Either (a) a man now so drunk on his own, rising celebrity he felt no need to adhere to even the most basic tenets of good manners or (b) one incapable of understanding that last sentence.

McGregor is building up a massive following in UFC and his impeccable physical conditioning speaks of an athlete who has worked extraordinarily hard to get to today's position.

It isn't written into any professional sports contract that the public must like you, only that they find the will to pay for a seat wherever it is you do your business.

But McGregor makes such a point of accentuating his Irishness, it's disappointing when it comes entangled in the foul language and cartoon braggadocio that so flavoured his press conference after the Denis Siver fight.

True, McGregor has never pretended to be Goldilocks in disguise. He fights, he says, simply because it brings him "shed-loads of money".

But it doesn't mean he has to turn the air bluer than the Pacific.

Irish Independent


Related Content