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Harry Tector impresses again but Ireland lose series after failing to trouble South Africa in second T20

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Ireland's Harry Tector in action. Action Images via Reuters/Matthew Childs

Ireland's Harry Tector in action. Action Images via Reuters/Matthew Childs

Ireland's Harry Tector in action. Action Images via Reuters/Matthew Childs

HARRY TECTOR again top-scored in a losing cause for Ireland on Friday night as South Africa eased to a 44-run victory in Bristol to claim a 2-0 win in the T20 mini-series.

In the form of his life, Tector has nevertheless found himself on the losing side in all 10 ‘home’ games this summer, despite making two centuries, and his 34 from 31 balls again fell well short of threatening a target of 182-6 under the lights

After Wayne Parnell had taken two wickets in two balls, on his way to figures of 5-30, Tector and Paul Stirling put on 38 for the third wicket, with the latter blasted two maximums and two fours before falling for 28.

Curtis Campher helped add another 47 for the fifth wicket but fell ramping Parnell to the keeper and the game was up two balls later when Tector lobbed a catch into the off-side ring.

George Dockrell, playing his 100th T20 international, followed in similar fashion, Mark Adair went next ball to a fine catch in the deep and it needed a spirited 32 from Barry McCarthy in a last-wicket stand of 42, to take Ireland to 138 all out.

The Ireland bowlers had started well, particularly spinners Andy McBrine and Gareth Delany, but both were mauled in their final overs and from 54-2 at halfway, lusty cameos from Aiden Markram and Heinrich Klaasen lifted the Proteas to 156-5 at the end of the 17th.

Josh Little tucked up Klaasen and had him caught at short third at the start of a superb 18th over and despite three sixes from David ‘if it’s in my arc, it’s out the park’ Miller, South Africa were unable to extend their record sequence of four 190+ scores.

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