Sunday 15 September 2019

England enjoy champagne super over

Jos Buttler breaks the stumps with New Zealand batsman Martin Guptill short of his ground as England won the World Cup at Lord’s. Photo: Peter Cziborra/Action Images via Reuters
Jos Buttler breaks the stumps with New Zealand batsman Martin Guptill short of his ground as England won the World Cup at Lord’s. Photo: Peter Cziborra/Action Images via Reuters

Rory Dollard

England's cricketers wrote their names into the history books at Lord's, winning their first World Cup in a final that will go down as one of the most dramatic ever in team sport.

It seemed as though nothing could separate them from New Zealand, with the sides battling to an unprecedented tie, both sides locked on 241 after 100 overs of nerve-shredding tension that cast Ben Stokes as the home side's hero of the hour.

That paved the way for a super over, a six-ball shoot-out that had only occurred 11 times in international history and never before in an ODI.

Incredibly, the teams went blow-for-blow once again, Stokes and Jos Buttler hitting 15 off Trent Boult before Jofra Archer conceded 14 off his first five deliveries.

The Barbados-born bowler, the least experienced player on either side, held his nerve as Martin Guptill forced the ball into the off-side and came back for a second that would have taken the trophy.

Enter Jason Roy, who picked up cleanly despite unimaginable pressure and hurled a flat, decisive throw towards Buttler, who scattered the stumps as Guptill scrambled.

Tied once again, England triumphed on account of boundaries scored in the original 50-over match, a technocratic decider in a contest that proved impossible to settle any other way.

In the end England's 22 fours and two sixes proved the difference, besting the Black Caps' tally of 14 and two, but they are just numbers, and do scant justice to the emotional, occasionally controversial and endlessly replayable events that played out on this famous ground.

"This has been a four-year journey and we have developed a lot over those four years, but particularly in the last two," said captain Eoin Morgan.

"We find it hard to play on wickets like that - as many good teams around the world do - but it was about playing cricket to get over the line and we managed to do that and it means the world to us."

Irish Independent

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