Wednesday 21 February 2018

Farah prepares for a final farewell to track racing

 

The four-time Olympic champion claimed victory in the 3,000 metres in Birmingham in seven minutes 38.64 seconds yesterday. Photo: Getty
The four-time Olympic champion claimed victory in the 3,000 metres in Birmingham in seven minutes 38.64 seconds yesterday. Photo: Getty

Cathal Dennehy and Nick Mashiter

Clonliffe Harriers and St. Abban's took victory in the premier divisions of the Irish Life Health National League finals in Tullamore yesterday.

On what was a miserably wet afternoon in the midlands, Clonliffe retained their title in the men's premier division ahead of Crusaders and Tipperary County. In the women's premier division, Laois club St. Abban's were impressive winners, with individual wins from Ruby Millet and Sarah Buggy helping them to victory over Dundrum South Dublin and Kildare.

Division one of the women's event was won by Donore Harriers ahead of Louth County and Kerry County, while the men's equivalent went to Wexford County ahead of Bandon Striders and St Laurence O'Toole.

Elsewhere yesterday Brian Gregan finished fifth over 400m at the Diamond League meeting in Birmingham, clocking 45.93 in a race won by Dwayne Cowan of Great Britain, who clocked 45.34.

Meanwhile, Mo Farah admitted he may not compete for Great Britain again after winning his final track race on home soil.

The four-time Olympic champion (pictured) claimed victory in the 3,000 metres in Birmingham in seven minutes 38.64 seconds yesterday.

He will retire from the track at the Diamond League final in Zurich on Thursday to focus on marathon racing.

Farah handed his vest to Andrew Butchart at the end of the race and conceded it will take him two years to get to grips with the marathon so there are no guarantees he will return for team Great Britain.

The 34-year-old said: "To be honest, to have achieved what I have achieved has been incredible. If I come out of the marathon and I'm the best at the marathon, I might compete, it depends.

"But as an athlete, the next couple of years, it's going to take me at least two or three marathons to get it right, to learn from it, it's not easy. It could be my last time.

"This is it for me, that was my message for Andy - 'this is me done, take over from me and inspire them, see what hard work is about and what it takes to be a champion.'"

Irish Independent

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