| 18.3°C Dublin

CAS uphold four-year anti-doping ban for Alberto Salazar

Close

Alberto Salazar’s four-year suspension for a series of doping violations has been upheld by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).

Alberto Salazar’s four-year suspension for a series of doping violations has been upheld by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).

Alberto Salazar’s four-year suspension for a series of doping violations has been upheld by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).

American Alberto Salazar, who has coached some of the world's top long-distance runners, had his four-year suspension for a series of anti-doping rule violations upheld by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS).

The 63-year-old, who guided Britain's Mo Farah to Olympic titles, was banned by the US Anti-Doping Agency in 2019 for "orchestrating and facilitating" doping as head coach of the Nike Oregon Project, an elite camp designed primarily to develop US endurance athletes.

CAS confirmed in a statement that a ban on endocrinologist Jeffrey Brown had also been upheld.

"CAS confirms the four-year bans imposed on Dr. Jeffrey Brown and Alberto Salazar for anti-doping rule violations," the court said on Thursday.

A full report by CAS is due to be published within days.
USADA said at the time of the suspension that Salazar, who also coached American Olympian Matthew Centrowitz, trafficked the banned performance-enhancing substance testosterone to multiple athletes.

Salazar also tampered or attempted to tamper with Nike Oregon Project athletes' doping control process, the agency said after concluding its four-year investigation.

Salazar won three consecutive New York City Marathons from 1980 and the famous Boston Marathon ‘Duel in the Sun’ against Dick Beardsley in 1982 before coaching a number of Olympians, including Farah, who won gold medals in the 5,000 and 10,000 metres at the 2012 London and 2016 Rio Games.

Farah has never failed a drugs test and has not been accused of any wrongdoing.

Salazar stopped coaching Farah in 2017, when the runner decided to move back to England. Farah said at the time that the doping investigation was not the reason they parted ways.

Sport Newsletter

Get the best analysis and comment from our award-winning team of writers and columnists with our free newsletter.

This field is required


Most Watched





Privacy