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Age no barrier to success, London Marathon boss tells ‘superb’ Mo Farah, 39, who is planning to retire

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Sir Mo Farah after winning the Big Half, which runs from Tower Bridge to Greenwich, London. Picture date: Sunday September 4, 2022.

Sir Mo Farah after winning the Big Half, which runs from Tower Bridge to Greenwich, London. Picture date: Sunday September 4, 2022.

Queen Elizabeth II presses a button in Windsor Castle in Berkshire to start the London Marathon.

Queen Elizabeth II presses a button in Windsor Castle in Berkshire to start the London Marathon.

Sir Mo Farah reacts after placing fifth in the Elite Men’s Race during the 2019 Virgin Money London Marathon.

Sir Mo Farah reacts after placing fifth in the Elite Men’s Race during the 2019 Virgin Money London Marathon.

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Sir Mo Farah after winning the Big Half, which runs from Tower Bridge to Greenwich, London. Picture date: Sunday September 4, 2022.

Mo Farah has been urged to take inspiration from world record holder Eliud Kipchoge ahead of Sunday’s London Marathon.

Four-time Olympic gold medallist Farah has yet to announce his plans for the future beyond this weekend’s event, but race director Hugh Brasher believes the 39-year-old is far from a spent force at the top level.

“I think that Eliud (who broke his own world record at the Berlin Marathon last Sunday) is proving – age 37 and he’s running a PB – that the age barriers that we used to think existed do not necessarily now exist,” said Brasher, who insisted Farah would always be welcome at the London Marathon.

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Mo Farah reacts after placing fifth in the Elite Men’s Race during the 2019 Virgin Money London Marathon.

Mo Farah reacts after placing fifth in the Elite Men’s Race during the 2019 Virgin Money London Marathon.

Mo Farah reacts after placing fifth in the Elite Men’s Race during the 2019 Virgin Money London Marathon.

“The door will always be open to Mo, he is Britain’s greatest ever endurance athlete – in terms of the number of Olympic gold medals, in terms of the World Championship gold medals.

“Our history goes back with him from the mini-marathon to the fact that we’ve supported him through his university time, something that’s not publicised that well.

“He is an absolutely superb athlete, he will always be welcome back and we’re really looking forward to having him there at the TCS London Marathon on Sunday.

“I hope he runs fantastically well.”

Sunday’s race will be the last to take place in October, with the race due to revert to its traditional spot in April from 2023.

Queen Elizabeth II will be remembered at Sunday’s event, although the exact nature of the tributes have not been disclosed.

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“We have some plans, we are working on them at the moment, they are being finalised,” Brasher said.

“We do plan to honour her majesty, Queen Elizabeth II. As a race we’ve had an amazing (history with her), she started our event in 2018.

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Queen Elizabeth II presses a button in Windsor Castle in Berkshire to start the London Marathon.

Queen Elizabeth II presses a button in Windsor Castle in Berkshire to start the London Marathon.

Queen Elizabeth II presses a button in Windsor Castle in Berkshire to start the London Marathon.

“The now Prince and Princess of Wales started it, with Harry (the Duke of Sussex) in 2017 and gave out the water, gave out medals on the finish line.”

“And the history of the marathon, the 26 miles 385 yards started from Windsor Castle in 1908, that was the first time that distance was run.

“So we absolutely think it is appropriate to do it (honour the Queen). We will announce what we are doing later but there will be a celebration of all that she did.

“She loved marathon running so we will be delighted to do that.”


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