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'I tried to take over the world but illness taught me that health is the only wealth that really matters'

Sports injury therapist Ger Hartmann on his secret role in Dublin's 'Drive for Five’ and making the most of his second chance

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Sports Injury Therapist Gerard Hartmann pictured in The Clare Glens Waterfall. Picture; Gerry Mooney

Sports Injury Therapist Gerard Hartmann pictured in The Clare Glens Waterfall. Picture; Gerry Mooney

Ger Hartmann at The Clare Glens Waterfall. Photo: Gerry Mooney

Ger Hartmann at The Clare Glens Waterfall. Photo: Gerry Mooney

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Sports Injury Therapist Gerard Hartmann pictured in The Clare Glens Waterfall. Picture; Gerry Mooney

He does it in such a nonchalant manner that there is little time to digest what's about to follow as Ger Hartmann lifts up his T-shirt and points to the colostomy bag that changed his life forever.

"That's my poo bag. I peel that off every morning and every night. You just get on with it, simple as that," he states matter-of-factly before documenting the life-threatening illnesses which made him reprogramme his body.

Hartmann is renowned for treating the cream of world sport and mending broken bodies, as well as minds, but he was forced to face his own demons when diagnosed with ulcerative colitis in 2011. Three years of heavy autoimmune suppression medications left him robbed of all vitality before having eight feet of his insides removed during three separate surgeries which pushed his body to the brink.