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Sound of silence can help or hinder in the quest for glory

Dermot Gilleece


Lack of galleries worked for 23-year-old Collin Morikawa to great effect

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Tiger Woods, Rory McIlroy and Brooks Koepka walk past an empty hospitality area on the 16th hole during the second round of The Memorial Tournament at Muirfield Village Photo: Jamie Squire

Tiger Woods, Rory McIlroy and Brooks Koepka walk past an empty hospitality area on the 16th hole during the second round of The Memorial Tournament at Muirfield Village Photo: Jamie Squire

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Tiger Woods, Rory McIlroy and Brooks Koepka walk past an empty hospitality area on the 16th hole during the second round of The Memorial Tournament at Muirfield Village Photo: Jamie Squire

Tournament golf has changed dramatically since modern spectator standards were shaped by the emergence of Arnie's Army at Augusta National back in 1959. With an entrance ticket available for a relatively modest $5, it was a time when the Masters was far from being the sell-out it would become.

So it was that by way of beefing up the galleries, any soldier in uniform from nearby Camp Gordon was given free access. And as Arnold Palmer later recalled: "When they found out I was the defending champion, they joined my gallery. That prompted one of the GIs working a back-nine scoreboard to announce the arrival of Arnie's Army."

An observant scribe from The Augusta Chronicle then produced the headline, 'Arnie's Army', leaving Palmer suitably pleased. "Boy, did it ever stick!" he enthused.