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Reed not concerned about the 'noise' as heckles beckon

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Patrick Reed's resilience will be stretched to breaking point in the forthcoming days.. Photo: Getty

Patrick Reed's resilience will be stretched to breaking point in the forthcoming days.. Photo: Getty

Getty Images

Patrick Reed's resilience will be stretched to breaking point in the forthcoming days.. Photo: Getty

Patrick Reed insists he is more worried about getting heckled by his caddie rather than the fans around the notorious 17th hole here at the Players Championship. Yet despite the controversial American's renowned strength of psyche, there can be little doubt that his resilience will be stretched at least in the direction of breaking point in the forthcoming days.

Tomorrow evening will certainly be interesting. As the second round concludes, Reed will play the island green at about 6pm, when certain members of the Sawgrass galleries will be at their most raucous following a day's "refreshment".

In the past, supporters on the banks behind the putting surface have been ejected for their abuse, with the most memorable moment occurring in 2010 when state troopers felt obliged to Taser one particularly overenthusiastic observer.

Despite security being increased and, indeed, well-behaved fans being invited to point out hecklers via text message to the authorities, Reed should expect similar treatment. It will be familiar, as well.

In December's Presidents Cup in Melbourne, Reed was harangued and his caddie was banned after an altercation with a fan.

That was in response to an incident the week before at the Hero World Challenge when he blatantly improved his lie in a bunker, a misdemeanour that he maintains was not intentional and for which he received only the minimum two-shot penalty.

It is three months on, but still it remains a hot topic in the locker room, with Brooks Koepka, the world No 3, recently accusing him of "building sandcastles" and Peter Kostis, Paul Casey's coach, declaring that he had witnessed Reed "improve his lie four times".

Reed, however, is adamant that he is not concerned. "No, not really," he said.

"You're always going to get a couple people that are going to say something. That's normal, any sport you play. When I get inside those ropes, I have a job to do and that's to have a chance to win and to provide for my family and represent myself the best way I can. I feel like I've been doing that."

Do not be surprised if Reed does not only come through "the noise", as he calls it, but actually excels in it. The world No 8 won the World Golf Championship in Mexico City last month just days after the criticisms levelled by Koepka and Kostis. (© Daily Telegraph, London)

Telegraph.co.uk