Friday 24 May 2019

It feels great to put a result on the board, it's a bit of a relief - Seamus Power

Seamus Power is confident that a PGA Tour win is within reach after an impressive showing at the RBC Heritage. Photo: Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images
Seamus Power is confident that a PGA Tour win is within reach after an impressive showing at the RBC Heritage. Photo: Jared C. Tilton/Getty Images

Brian Keogh

Seamus Power walked away from the RBC Heritage on Sunday with even more respect for Tiger Woods and renewed belief that his own moment of glory is near at hand.

Like Shane Lowry, who was initially disappointed to finish just two shots behind CT Pan in joint third, he craves victory as much as Woods did at the Masters.

But as he made the four-hour drive from Harbour Town to his home in Charlotte on Sunday, he reflected on his share of sixth place and his precious haul of 92 FedExCup points as major stepping stones on the journey to the ultimate goal - a PGA Tour win.

After a wretched start to the season, the West Waterford man (32) jumped to 141st in the FedExCup standings, leaving him just 29 points outside the top 125 who keep their cards.

But buoyed by his new coaching relationship with Co Down man Justin Parsons, he partners Canadian David Hearn in this week's Zurich Classic of New Orleans gunning to improve on last year's tie for fifth.

"I knew it was coming," said Power, less than 24 hours after Sunday's final-round 67.

"And it feels great to actually put a result on the board. It's a bit of a relief as well, I needed the aul' points badly.

"When it is going poorly, everything seems so hard. But when you get into contention and look at the leaderboard, you think, 'Jeez, I could have won that tournament.'

"It just kind of confirms what you know deep down, that winning a tournament is very do-able."

Lowry's season has been a feast or a famine and while initially disappointed not to win, he knows his game is trending in the right direction as the PGA and the US Open approach.

"I personally feel like it almost got away," said Lowry, who teams up with Pádraig Harrington in New Orleans as Graeme McDowell partners Henrik Stenson.

"I'm a little bit disappointed right now but this was my best week in quite a while. I've already won this year, so this is my ninth tournament and I've had another great chance to win, so I suppose I'm doing things right."

Power has come through an even rougher patch than Lowry, missing 11 of 15 cuts before Sunday's tie for sixth.

And while he knows a win is no pipedream, he also knows from seeing world number one Dustin Johnson shoot 77 on Sunday that even the best can find it tough to get over the line.

"It's not easy to win," Power said.

"When Tiger Woods was at his best - and he showed it again in the Masters - he just never seemed to make a mistake when he was under the gun.

"It almost gave you a false sense of how easy or how difficult it actually is, even for some of the best players in the world, as we saw with Dustin Johnson at the weekend

"You need a lot of things to go your way. But I was only three shots behind the winner and you can find three shots somewhere over 72 holes by scraping away those little mistakes."

The addition of Parsons as coach has been key for Power, who is now putting for birdies rather than pars.

"We got chatting at Riviera and I sent him on a swing, and he had a look at it and had some good ideas," said Power, who had his best result straight away, finishing 35th in The Players.

The pride of Tooraneena still misses that winning feeling but he's positive about what lies ahead and not content with merely keeping his card.

"There are a lot of perks to playing professional golf, but you do it for that feeling of winning tournaments," he said.

"I will always remember winning the Irish Youths, the first major tournament I won at home.

"To this day I always remember that feeling and holing that putt at the end. That is the feeling you are always searching for."

Irish Independent

The Left Wing: Leinster's succession plan, Munster's missing piece and the art of contract negotiations

Editor's Choice

Also in Sport