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Young men have been taught to say nothing. As products go, the GAA is a boring one

Joe Brolly


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‘I was in a wonderful world of my own, fully immersed. No-one knew I was there. I didn’t have a computer chip sowed into my jersey’

‘I was in a wonderful world of my own, fully immersed. No-one knew I was there. I didn’t have a computer chip sowed into my jersey’

SPORTSFILE

‘I was in a wonderful world of my own, fully immersed. No-one knew I was there. I didn’t have a computer chip sowed into my jersey’

In the 1920s, German philosopher Eugen Herrigel visited Japan to study archery and zen under the renowned master Awa Kenzô.

What he discovered surprised him. Kenzô taught him that the point of archery was not to hit the target or defeat the opponent. The point was to become so deeply absorbed in the activity itself that the outside world disappeared.

Winning or losing was merely a by-product. The important thing was to revel in the performance of the task. The fascinating thing he discovered was that those who were able to absorb themselves fully in the contest were also the ones most likely to win.