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Underage GAA games get the green light to resume as country enters Level 3

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Dublin are set to face Galway in the U20 All-Ireland final. Photo by David Fitzgerald/Sportsfile

Dublin are set to face Galway in the U20 All-Ireland final. Photo by David Fitzgerald/Sportsfile

Dublin are set to face Galway in the U20 All-Ireland final. Photo by David Fitzgerald/Sportsfile

The GAA has got the green light to restart its provincial minor and U-20 competitions as the country moves to Level Three of the Living With Covid plan.

When the country moved to Level Five in October, underage inter-county games were prohibited with only senior inter-county games proceeding as they were considered in the elite bracket.

But approval was given this evening and Leinster GAA has wasted no time in publishing some of their fixtures with the minor football championship due to resume on Saturday week, December 12. The minor hurling championship will resume on the following day, December 13.

Munster and Connacht are expected to follow in the morning but Ulster can't train or play any games until December 10 at the earliest.

However the All-Ireland U-20 football final between Dublin and Galway may not now go ahead until the new year. It was originally thought that it could precede the All-Ireland football final on Saturday, December 19 and a date is likely to be set in the coming days.

Club action remains suspended and as long as the country remains in Level Three, which could be well into 2021, it is unlikely to resume.

And schools and third-level GAA will not proceed either as long as level three remains. The provinces had been hoping to get second-level schools game up and running in January but those competitions now look in jeopardy.

Meanwhile, former player Paddy Bradley has been appointed Derry U-20 manager while Mark Breheny has been added to Tony McEntee's management team in Sligo.

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