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The fists and sticks of faction fighting days may be gone but no shock in emergence of usual club/county conflict

Colm O'Rourke


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St Sylvester’s players Eoghan Manning and Brian Walsh attach netting to the goal before a hurling challenge against St Patrick’s Donabate at Malahide Castle last week. Photo: Piaras Ó Mídheach

St Sylvester’s players Eoghan Manning and Brian Walsh attach netting to the goal before a hurling challenge against St Patrick’s Donabate at Malahide Castle last week. Photo: Piaras Ó Mídheach

St Sylvester’s players Eoghan Manning and Brian Walsh attach netting to the goal before a hurling challenge against St Patrick’s Donabate at Malahide Castle last week. Photo: Piaras Ó Mídheach

It's a pity that all of the goodwill generated by the return to play did not last long. Faction fighting was a feature of GAA activity in the past. The fists and sticks have been replaced by more sophisticated methods but everyone still fights their corner so it only took a few days before the usual club/county conflict emerged.

For many, giving clubs a dedicated window after the lockdown was a sensible enough solution to a major crisis, but it all unravelled very quickly.


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