Tuesday 20 August 2019

Technology to assist referees is next move for association, insists Daly

Technology to review goals, penalty decisions and red cards has been in place in International Rules since 2010 with South African Ian Curlewis charged with responsibility for overseeing it (stock photo)
Technology to review goals, penalty decisions and red cards has been in place in International Rules since 2010 with South African Ian Curlewis charged with responsibility for overseeing it (stock photo)
Colm Keys

Colm Keys

The GAA rejected a move to introduce video technology to assist match officials at its Central Council meeting in March - however, the association's director of games development and research has not ruled out further attempts to bring it on board.

Pat Daly, whose department oversaw the successful introduction of Hawk-Eye in 2013, feels video technology in certain circumstances is a next step as the search for consistent application of rules continues.

But so far the GAA have resisted it on "philosophical" grounds.

"It's understandable that some would have misgivings and fears," said Daly, "but you take Hawk-Eye. It's now accepted and is normalised. All you are doing is trying to get some consistency. And if you extend that principle a little, you get into the same space here."

The issue of video technology has been raised again after Tipperary had three goals disallowed on Sunday, and a Wexford goal that might not have been. The colour of John McGrath's second yellow card was another possible matter of review.

"I can only base it on what I have seen with Hawk-Eye, he (review official) has the technology in front of him. The referee doesn't go looking to him for a decision, he basically goes to the official saying, 'Is there any reason why I can't make it'. What he wants is an endorsement for whatever he thinks the decision is. He is not going up saying, 'Make a decision for me'.

Responsibility

Technology to review goals, penalty decisions and red cards has been in place in International Rules since 2010 with South African Ian Curlewis charged with responsibility for overseeing it.

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"It has been in place for penalties, goals and sendings-off. They are game-altering decisions. If you have a game-altering decision, you have to ensure that it's right," said Daly.

"It's been called a couple of times. It's fine, you get a decision. I won't say the ref is off the hook but everybody is happy.

"The one thing everyone wants is consistent application of the rules, Hawk-Eye has done that with score detection and if you can push that out another bit, it would be welcomed.

"We felt that if we needed to push forward, we had a basis for pushing forward. We wouldn't be starting from a clean slate."

Daly feels that technology can facilitate decision-making but does raise questions about "where to draw the line" in the context of Saturday's deflection from a sideline, that was missed by the officials, and denied Limerick the opportunity of a potentially equalising '65.

"If you go down to that fractional stuff, where does it stop?" he asked.

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