| 11.7°C Dublin

Close

Premium


Some may get raw deal but straight Championship knockout would give the rest a puncher’s chance to stop Dubs

Eamonn Sweeney


Knockout format may be needed but return of GAA fare will be sign we have survived crisis

Close

Shaping up for a knockout: Dublin players (from left) John Small, Brian Fenton and Ciarán Kilkenny celebrate last year’s final replay win over Kerry, but if the format were to change this year, there might be other banana skins to worry about. Photo: Eóin Noonan/Sportsfile

Shaping up for a knockout: Dublin players (from left) John Small, Brian Fenton and Ciarán Kilkenny celebrate last year’s final replay win over Kerry, but if the format were to change this year, there might be other banana skins to worry about. Photo: Eóin Noonan/Sportsfile

SPORTSFILE

Shaping up for a knockout: Dublin players (from left) John Small, Brian Fenton and Ciarán Kilkenny celebrate last year’s final replay win over Kerry, but if the format were to change this year, there might be other banana skins to worry about. Photo: Eóin Noonan/Sportsfile

The 2020 All-Ireland championships are going to be very different. But they could also look pretty familiar.

When the current shutdown eventually ends, the only option available to the GAA will probably be a retro-style straight knockout competition. For the first time since 1996 in hurling and 2000 in football, teams could have to cope without a back door.

The remainder of the leagues, qualifiers, the Super 8s, the provincial round robins and tier two will most likely bite the dust. Nobody will care. They'll just be glad to see some action. This year's championship will probably be the most appreciated of all-time.


Related Content