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Jimmy Gray, ‘The Godfather’ of the renaissance of Gaelic games in the capital

Former Dublin chairman, responsible for bringing Kevin Heffernan in as football manager back in the 1970s, has an engaging personal memoir, titled Under The Bluest Sky

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Jimmy Gray at home in Glasnevin recently. Photo: Steve Humphreys

Jimmy Gray at home in Glasnevin recently. Photo: Steve Humphreys

Jimmy Gray at home in Glasnevin recently. Photo: Steve Humphreys

In the period of transition from the 1950s into the early television age, Dublin hurlers left a modest indentation on the national consciousness. Sixty-one years ago, they won the Leinster senior title in Kilkenny, beating Wexford, who were reigning All-Ireland champions.

While they would go on to lose the All-Ireland final to Tipperary by just a point, a defining moment of missed opportunity for Dublin hurling, at least the Leinster title meant they savoured the feeling of winning a championship. They had a tangible reward, but no glorious dawn was breaking. It is one of the moments relived in a recent autobiography of Jimmy Gray, now 92, the goalkeeper on that team.


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