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We must follow rules, says Walsh, who admits he would have risked health to play in past

 

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On behalf of Electric Ireland, Darkness Into Light Ambassador and former Kilkenny hurler, Tommy Walsh is encouraging the public to come together, while staying apart by getting up at 5:30am on May 9th to watch the sunrise to show solidarity with those impacted by suicide. Photo: INPHO/James Crombie

On behalf of Electric Ireland, Darkness Into Light Ambassador and former Kilkenny hurler, Tommy Walsh is encouraging the public to come together, while staying apart by getting up at 5:30am on May 9th to watch the sunrise to show solidarity with those impacted by suicide. Photo: INPHO/James Crombie

©INPHO/James Crombie

On behalf of Electric Ireland, Darkness Into Light Ambassador and former Kilkenny hurler, Tommy Walsh is encouraging the public to come together, while staying apart by getting up at 5:30am on May 9th to watch the sunrise to show solidarity with those impacted by suicide. Photo: INPHO/James Crombie

Kilkenny hurling legend Tommy Walsh admitted that his younger self would not hesitate to tog out for the Cats in a championship later this year, even without a Covid-19 vaccine.

The nine-time All-Ireland winner acknowledged that his own safety would not have been at the forefront of his mind during his playing days and that many younger players can relate to that same feeling of invincibility.

Walsh would have no fear for himself but the 37-year-old said the health of others during the pandemic would now come before his own and possibly change his outlook on wearing the black and amber.

"When you're young, you feel invincible so you never feel that this is going to affect you. If I was a single man with no family and nobody else around me, I'd go back and you wouldn't be worried one bit about yourself really," Walsh explained.

"That's kind of the way you're built but everyone has parents, everyone has… most people with underlying conditions so that's the only thing that I would be worried about, that you pick it up and you pass it on to somebody else.

"It would be very difficult to live with that. At the same time, how many people die in accidents every day before this Covid-19 so if you never go out and do anything, nothing will happen anyway.

"I'm sure we'll have to try and get back to some kind of normal life and that will probably coincide with a vaccine. Would I feel safe going back without the vaccine? I wouldn't be as worried about myself but you'd be worried maybe for other people."

Irish Independent