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There still remains significant resistance in hurling to head-high challenges being punishable by red cards

Colm Keys


Breaking Ball

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Referee Paud O'Dwyer with team captains, Tipperary's Séamus Callanan and Limerick's Declan Hannon, before last Sunday's Munster SHC final at Páirc Uí Chaoimh. Photo: Piaras Ó Mídheach/Sportsfile

Referee Paud O'Dwyer with team captains, Tipperary's Séamus Callanan and Limerick's Declan Hannon, before last Sunday's Munster SHC final at Páirc Uí Chaoimh. Photo: Piaras Ó Mídheach/Sportsfile

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Referee Paud O'Dwyer with team captains, Tipperary's Séamus Callanan and Limerick's Declan Hannon, before last Sunday's Munster SHC final at Páirc Uí Chaoimh. Photo: Piaras Ó Mídheach/Sportsfile

When rival managers declare that their respective teams have reached peak performance on their watch at different stages during the same match, you know you have witnessed something extraordinary.

The stunning nature of Limerick’s comeback in Sunday’s Munster hurling final was rooted, not in the fact that they had overturned a 10-point deficit but how quickly and ruthlessly they had done it.


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