Thursday 19 September 2019

GAA community pays respects to Limerick legend Enright

There are many who remain convinced that if Enright hadn’t been forced off with an injury in the 1981 replay, Limerick would have dethroned Galway and set themselves up for an All-Ireland final clash with Offaly. Photo by Ray McManus/Sportsfile
There are many who remain convinced that if Enright hadn’t been forced off with an injury in the 1981 replay, Limerick would have dethroned Galway and set themselves up for an All-Ireland final clash with Offaly. Photo by Ray McManus/Sportsfile
Martin Breheny

Martin Breheny

The high esteem in which Leonard Enright, who died on Friday night aged 65, was held was underlined over the weekend when numerous tributes poured in - not just from Patrickswell and Limerick, but from all across the GAA community.

GAA president, John Horan said that, as well being remembered for "all his skill and ability on the field", Enright's name was also synonymous "with the positive impact he had on so many people".

"I know Leonard is fondly remembered by people all over Ireland who came into contact with him through his work with Mary Immaculate College in helping to develop Gaelic Games there," added Horan.

In a poignant coincidence, one of Patrickswell's finest performers died on the night that his young club colleague, Cian Lynch, was named Hurler of the Year, having also been chosen at midfield on the All-Stars team.

Enright stood on the All-Star podium three times (1980, 1981 and 1983), each time as a full-back - a position he made his own after Pat Hartigan was forced to retire due to an eye injury sustained in 1979.

Limerick won successive Munster titles in 1980 and 1981, but failed to complete the All-Ireland journey, having been twice halted by Galway in the final and semi-final replay.

There are many who remain convinced that if Enright (above) hadn't been forced off with an injury in the 1981 replay, Limerick would have dethroned Galway and set themselves up for an All-Ireland final clash with Offaly.

All-Ireland glory continued to elude Limerick, but they won successive League titles in 1984 and 1985, with Enright as captain.

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The Limerick legend, who was inducted into the GAA Museum's Hall of Fame last August, is survived by his wife, Birdie, sons Alan, Thomas and David, daughter Mary and grandchildren.

Funeral Mass today (11.30) in the Church of the Blessed Virgin, Patrickswell, followed by burial in St Mary's new cemetery.

 

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